Some collected Oaks

grizzlywon

Shohin
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I got permission to collect some Oaks at a friends property last weekend and wanted to get your takes on them. The first two have nice bark, but not a lot of taper and almost no roots. I'm guessing it would be best to cut them back hard. I think the first roots must have been about 3' down! I'll treat them like cuttings or firewood if they don't make it. Maybe just put them in sand and wait a year to see if they make it before I waist any time on them?

The last one I think would make a nice small broom style? It has lots of roots and decent Nebari and the bark is getting gnarly too. Cut at the red lines?
 

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timhanson81

Yamadori
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Are you sure that last one is an Oak? It kind of looks like some sort of Ceanothus, maybe "buckbrush" (Ceanothus cuneatas)? www.calflora.net/bloomingplants/buckbrush.html If that's what it is, I've never seen one as a bonsai, but always thought they would be good candidates because of their small, almost boxwood like leaves.

Tim
 

grizzlywon

Shohin
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Tim, you maybe right. I don't know if it flowers or not, but there are lots of these on the property. It might explain why I got lots of roots near the surface when I collected this on, unlike the others.
 

rockm

Imperial Masterpiece
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I usually wait two years before even thinking about what a newly collected tree will look like or what I should do to it.

You have no idea right now what you will have to work on with these down the road. They may flourish. They could, however, die off in unfortunate places, or collapse completely.

I'd just leave them be for now.
 
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