Some questions about my acer palmatum

Fidur

Shohin
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About a month ago, I saw this (or maybe these two) acer in a nursery (no labels), wich is very rare here. Probably because of our weather. I know it will be a challenge to keep this alive trough the years, but I will try it gets the winter dormancy
I think it's a green acer "Sonkootgre" (though it's not important to me)
It's been very healthy and in the last couple weeks it is growing new branches.

IMG_20210812_133027.jpg IMG_20210812_132622.jpg

I would like to know about some issues I don't completly understand.
If you look at this pic,

IMG_20210812_132731.jpg
a) Is it grafted ? I think it is not, but ....
b) In the left sapling there is a problem where those 4 branches join . Also it seems there are two different saplings. What should you do about if it were yours?
c) Those aerial roots are normal? Should I remove them?
d) If you look closer, you'll see some white points. I have watched them with my magnifying glass, and also touched them. No bugs, but a white powder. And it only happens in the boundaries of recently lignified areas (not in buds or sprouts). Do you know what can it be?

Thanks in advance for your comments.
 

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Chumono
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You would have to dig down a little to see if there are 2 trees on their own roots. I do not see a graft. Maybe others may see one.

What I think happened is that the soil was originally up and over the exposed roots and the pot was knocked over and the soil spilled out and was not replaced.

The 4 branch junction on the left will cause inverse taper down the road if left alone. If it were mine, I would keep the main thickest leader and the left most branch growing outward. It will open up the middle of the tree as well.
 

Fidur

Shohin
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You would have to dig down a little to see if there are 2 trees on their own roots. I do not see a graft. Maybe others may see one.
Yes, next spring I will find out if I can divide, or a two trunk it will be.
What I think happened is that the soil was originally up and over the exposed roots and the pot was knocked over and the soil spilled out and was not replaced.
So this is not a typical behaviour of the spice. Then I will remove those exposed roots in due time...
The 4 branch junction on the left will cause inverse taper down the road if left alone. If it were mine, I would keep the main thickest leader and the left most branch growing outward. It will open up the middle of the tree as well.
Yes, that's the problem I previewed. I will do what you suggest.

About that powder, is it something typical in early lignifications?, Maybe some lime?....or could it be a fungi?
 

rodeolthr

Mame
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It is possible that this is a rooted cutting and you happen to have found one that has 2 in one pot.
 

bwaynef

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a) Is it grafted ? I think it is not, but ....
No
b) In the left sapling there is a problem where those 4 branches join . Also it seems there are two different saplings. What should you do about if it were yours?
Simplify the branching. Leave the primary trunk and one branch. Make sure the branch you leave comes off the trunk at a pleasing angle and won't interfere with the branching elsewhere in the tree/planting. Its entirely possible this is two seedlings. You can determine that at repot time next spring.
c) Those aerial roots are normal? Should I remove them?
Its normal and I'd probably work to remove them, but you need more information. It will likely be obvious what to do when you're repotting it in this spring.
d) If you look closer, you'll see some white points. I have watched them with my magnifying glass, and also touched them. No bugs, but a white powder. And it only happens in the boundaries of recently lignified areas (not in buds or sprouts). Do you know what can it be?
I've seen white on JMaples, usually as striations when the trunks age a bit. I'd keep a watch on these white specks though.
 

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