spanish moss air layer??

Joe Dupre'

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Anyone used spanish moss for airlayering? I went out in my collecting woods and started an airlayer with the local spanish moss on an 1 1/8" sweet gum that has a little movement. I realize it's a different type of moss, but the physical characteristics of the two are quite similar. I've read sphagnum moss has some antiseptic properties while I've never read that about spanish moss. Well, as one of my buddies says "You don't know 'til you go."

At worst, I'll have a dud and maybe mess up one of a zillion sweet gums around these parts. At best, I may have found a new medium for air layering.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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Spanish moss is Tillandsia usneoides - it is a flowering plant, with tiny blue petaled flowers and seeds with fluff on them like dandelions. Spanish moss is related to pineapples and other bromeliads.

Sphagnum moss is a true moss, no flowers, spores instead.

The sphagnum holds large amounts of water. Spanish moss will hold very little water. It will hold some, but not much. In all likelyhood, if you get rain once a week or less, the spanish moss will be too dry to work for an air layer.

But Spanish moss is an indicator of a humid, moist environment. Maybe there will be enough moisture. Time will tell.
 

sorce

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If it needs water, it's more likely there's an anti-rooting agent involved, since if a tree roots under it, it gets no more water.

I ain't from down there, but I never even heard of a tree rooting under it, I reckon it would be a thing if it were a thing.

Sorce
 

Joe Dupre'

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Ok, sorce, ya might have to explain that one to me. Not quite sure what you mean.
 

BuckeyeOne

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Ok, sorce, ya might have to explain that one to me. Not quite sure what you mean.
Nobody does anymore! 🤪
I think what he is trying to say is that if it worked, more people would be doing it.
Also, his reference to " I ain't from down there", means he's not from Louisiana.

I can't believe I'm interpreting "sorce" speak!!!
 
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PattyB

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I have never done an air layer but I have grown Spanish moss, mostly as an addition to terrariums and orchid pots/baskets. As Leo mentioned it is a Tillandsia or as most know them, Air Plants. They are not parasitic rather they are epiphytes. These plants need air to survive or they will die quickly and rot. Spanish moss has tiny lavender star shaped flowers and they are a nice addition to terrarium plantings. I could be wrong, gasp!, but I wouldn’t want rotting Spanish moss as a medium for an air layer.
 

sorce

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Ok, sorce, ya might have to explain that one to me. Not quite sure what you mean.
It goes against the natural symbiotic relationship, so it's not likely to work.

The plant won't assist in lessening it's possible water intake, at worst, like the sphagnum has rooting properties, it has anti rooting properties.

The slight fact that this is possible would have me cancel the experiment.

I thought the seeming move to straight soil for layers was the smartest, since it removes a repotting step.

But we still wrap these roots in full unchopped sphagnum and small plastic bags, it's ridiculous.

From layer to Bonsai, we can save like 10 years if we prepare and prevent. Doing things right and not doing stupid stuff. (Not meaning your experiment is stupid, we must grow)

Folks don't see the benefit of things like RadialDisks and smart beginnings, because it's all negated by other stupid shit, and we fumble along this path that takes 20 years because doing one good thing and one bad thing cancel each other out.

We must keep doing the right thing so we can begin to experience the exponential excellence that comes from am appropriate beginning.

Sorce
 

Joe Dupre'

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Well, the meaning of an experiment is trying something to see what happens. So, cancelling an experiment is not to experiment at all. The tree is the only one taking a chance.

"Hey, I wonder what would happen if............" is worth 10 minutes of my time any day. Failure is also a learning experience. I've spent more time and effort and gotten less MANY times in my life.
 

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