Spider Webs on Foliage

yenling83

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I have been getting a ton of spider webs on my junipers foliage lately. I inspect them twice a day and it seems every afternoon there are more webs. I've been spraying a standard bug spray I purchased from home depot every few months.

My questions:

How damaging can spiders and their webs be?

Should I be spraying more often or with something else?

Do you cover the soil with something when you spray?
 

Bill S

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Could be a couple of those the well is deep subjects.

Start with the good possibility, is that they are actually spider webs, spiders will eat the pests you don't want there.

Spider Mites on the other hand are a not so good thing for Juni's, have you heard of the shake the tree over some plain white paper and then look very closely for little bittie critters scurring about. What you want to see when you do this is a bunch of little bittie pieces of stuff just sitting there not moving, if they are moving about, then you should start dealing with spidermites.

Many insecticidals talk about working for these, but often we hear they don't. Lets get someone knowledgeable on them to tell us what nasty concoction to give them a drink of, I haven't had to deal with them. Possibl because when I water my juni's I water the whole tree, especially the foliage, S mites prefer dry, so if I got em I keep raining on thier parade.

Guess one of the first things I should have asked is if there is any apparent damage to the tree/s??
 

treebeard55

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If they're spiders, they eat insects, mites, caterpillars -- they're carnivores. Your trees are in no danger from them. But you want to ask what's attracting that many spiders to the vicinity. (Like ants giving away the presence of aphids.)

Have you made sure they aren't spider mites? Despite the name, those aren't spiders, tho they are arachnids. They're bad news, because they will feed on your plants.

There are also carnivorous mites (to further complicate the picture,) that feed on the plant-feeding mites. Those can be identified by the fact that they're bigger (maybe as big as a pinhead,) more energetic, and sport the most incredible red and orange colors. The color is so vivid, it looks artificial! The first time I saw one, I thought at first a fleck of colored plastic had moved in the breeze.

I usually cover the soil when I spray a heavy dose of any insecticide, just to be on the safe side.

A MOMENT LATER: Bill and I were obviously typing at the same time. I'll vouch for what he said, that many insecticides claim to be effective against spider mites but are not. You want a miticide. I would personally start looking with the Bayer products, assuming you verify the presence of mites.
 
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mcpesq817

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I think if you are getting as many as you say, the likely culprit is a spider mite infestation. In my limited experience, the spider mite webs are less taut and structured than typical spider webs. You also might see strands from branch to branch or tree to tree that I think act more like roadways for them (though I could be wrong). You can use an oil based spray which should knock them out. You might need to spray a few days apart to catch the upcoming offspring to the extent eggs were laid.
 

HotAction

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There are also carnivorous mites (to further complicate the picture,) that feed on the plant-feeding mites. Those can be identified by the fact that they're bigger (maybe as big as a pinhead,) more energetic, and sport the most incredible red and orange colors. The color is so vivid, it looks artificial! The first time I saw one, I thought at first a fleck of colored plastic had moved in the breeze.
QUOTE]


Are you saying not to worry about those little red mites I have been battling with every year?

Dave
 

coh

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Dave, are you referring to those small, bright red spider-like critters that run really fast? They're large enough to be easily seen by eye (as opposed to the almost microscopic, evil spider mites that damage plants). I've always assumed those were harmless...though I don't know exactly what they are. Web searching revealed contradictory info...perhaps velvet mite or clover mite. The former is actually an insect predator, the latter does suck plant juices. Anyone know more about these?

Chris
 

october

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Hello treebeard and HotAction.. Every year, I have those brightly red colored, small mites or whatever they are all around and on my trees and pots.. They have never caused any damage... I was talking about them up at the nursery and they mentioned that they may be some kind of spider and not damaging mites.. I was wondering if anyone knows exactlye what they are. They have never seemed to cause any damage what so ever over the years.. Maybe I should shut up..lol

Now scale on the other hand...It's back again and in full effect...
 

treebeard55

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... Are you saying not to worry about those little red mites I have been battling with every year?

Dave
Well, maybe. At least one species of sap-sucking mite buggers is red, and those are The Enemy.

The predaceous mites are about twice as big as their cousins (which isn't saying too much at that scale;) much more energetic, scurrying hither and thither as they hunt; and again, a red or orange that almost looks artificial! Mites, not insects: eight legs (if they'll hold still long enough to let you count. ;) )
 
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I know it sounds funny, but If they are normal spiders they might be just hangin around cause it cool and kinda dark under those pads, I agree with Bill, I water the whole tree, foilage as well, and as often a poss. Also, junipers, seem to catch just about everything falling out of the sky, it all gets tucked away in all those nooks and crannies, so make sure to go through and periodically remove all that crap... all kinds of critters will start hanging out in it if not. Now spider mites are red in color they usually thrive in Hot, dry conditions. Spider mites will also adapt quickly too and resist pesticides, so chemical control methods can become somewhat ineffectual when the same pesticide is used over a prolonged period.
 
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