Stainless Steel Tools - Much better?

edro

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jk_lewis

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Stainless tools do not hld their edge as well.

"Every once and a while" is not enough protection, but regular forged steel tools will least for many years if you wipe them down every time you use them. I'm still using a 25-year-old pair of small concave cutters.
 

Walter Pall

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Stainless steel tools are not better, they are worse, only prettyer. The main rason is that they cannot be sharpened easily or at all. They should be cheaper than the black ones.
 

edro

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Wow, thanks for the replies.
How often does everyone oil their tools or wipe them down with oil?
Do yours get surface rust?
 

fore

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Only if I accidentally left them out in the rain overnight lol But I bought, from Stone Lantern I think, 3 sanding blocks: fine, med, and course. They work fantastic in getting rid of minor to even major rust. I've been using them to clean the tools if needed after every use. Then a slight oiling and they are as good as new.
 

Mike423

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You could probably use a steel cloth to remove it easily which you can find at any hardware store. I would recommend trying to find one more like an abrasive cloth over the heavy duty metal mesh type. I also find 3 in 1 brand multipurpose oil or something similar works best for lubing up my tools. It has a thicker viscosity than WD40 and is more suited for what your intended use is. It wont dissipate from the moving joints as quickly either.
 
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PaulH

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I've got quite a few masakuni tools both in the stainless and carbon steel, that I've been using for over 25 years. If I was starting over I would not buy the stainless tools. Walter is correct. they just don't hold an edge like the carbon tools.
Paul
 

jk_lewis

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I've got quite a few masakuni tools both in the stainless and carbon steel, that I've been using for over 25 years. If I was starting over I would not buy the stainless tools. Walter is correct. they just don't hold an edge like the carbon tools.
Paul

Those are the ones you usually end up using for roots.
 

edro

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I have one of those Japanese sanding blocks for bonsai tools.
It works great at getting pine sap, dirt and grime off of the tools.
It also sands the black finish off of the tools, so I only use it on the cutting surfaces that are already bare metal.

My problem is the entire tool is showing surface rust. Handles and all.
I keep them in my garage, which I guess has high humidity.
All of my tools are Joshua Roth. Some are lower grade ($40), others are higher grade ($60).

WD40 and a good rub with a rag or steel wool takes all the rust off, but WD40 isn't mitigating the rust very well.
Maybe I need a better penetrating oil. The other problem is if I put enough oil on to mitigate the rust, they are too greasy to hold and use.

Anyone else use a different oil for the entire tool? Not just the joints.
 

Smoke

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I have one of those Japanese sanding blocks for bonsai tools.
It works great at getting pine sap, dirt and grime off of the tools.
It also sands the black finish off of the tools, so I only use it on the cutting surfaces that are already bare metal.

My problem is the entire tool is showing surface rust. Handles and all.
I keep them in my garage, which I guess has high humidity.
All of my tools are Joshua Roth. Some are lower grade ($40), others are higher grade ($60).

WD40 and a good rub with a rag or steel wool takes all the rust off, but WD40 isn't mitigating the rust very well.
Maybe I need a better penetrating oil. The other problem is if I put enough oil on to mitigate the rust, they are too greasy to hold and use.

Anyone else use a different oil for the entire tool? Not just the joints.

WD40 was never intended to be a lubricant for preventing rust. The public has come to use this stuff for everything except what it was designed for. (removing water from circuit boards) W=water, D=displacer and 40 was 40th formula. WD40.

Get yourself a can of navel jelly and clean your tools well with it. Clean them with 00 steelwool. Then dry them in the oven at about 110 degrees for about 15 minutes. Keep the oven on.

Get yourself a can of hoppee's gun oil. Coat the tools in gun oil and put back in the oven for an hour this time. let them cool and then rub down with the steelwool. then coat the tools with gun oil and wipe down. store your tools in a small canvas bag that you can get at Home Depot for a couple bucks. Once the black tools have been properly seasoned they will hardly ever rust again, unless you carelessly leave then on the bench and water them or leave them out in a rain storm.


hope that helps.

And me and stainless...hate them...what a waste of money.
 

jk_lewis

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I keep an oily rag (3 in 1 oil) tucked away in my bag and wipe my tools with it every time they go back inside.
 

Shima

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I have black steel tools and live in a rain forest. When I discovered Corrosion X my rust problems were over. It goes on thick and gloppy but the next day it reduces quite a bit and you can wipe off the rest. The tool stays protected. Corrosion X is sold in fishing and marine supply stores. Goggle it.
 
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fore

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Klytus, it's like those Garryflex.

edro, you are right, these blocks can remove the black finish, but I'd rather have a nice smooth and clean finish. But I can understand your reluctance on a $60 tool ;)
 

Mike423

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Like I said before you can use 3 in 1 oil which can be found in any hardware store for a few bucks and last a good long time. I even says on the bottle that one of its uses are for gardening tools. I use it to not only grease the joints but wipe down the entire tool to place a thin coating on it to fight of moisture exposure when not being used.
 

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