Standard JM

Messages
129
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168
Location
North GA
#1
I picked up this JM this morning for a what I thought was a pretty decent price at a local nursery. So excited to dig into this thing this year. Plans are going to include layering off one or possibly two of the apexes, chopping back the thicker trunks, tons of root work, thread grafting, maybe approach grafting some young JM I have, trying some techniques like Ebihara and Van Meer, so much fun to be had! I don't really want to just cut it back to a stump and regrow everything. So hopefully I can come up with a plan that will allow me to keep as much as possible, but still have taper throughout the tree.

One thing that concerns me is a patch of blackish/dead part on the back of the trunk. But it looks like it has started to heal, maybe I can post a picture and see what you guys think?

I'll post an update this spring. At this point I have more experience buying nursery trees and making plans than actual experience working on them, haha, but it's all good.
IMG_20180122_093301.jpg IMG_20180122_093306.jpg IMG_20180122_093511.jpg
 

AndyJ

Yamadori
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92
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59
Location
Cumbria, UK
#3
Be interesting to see where you go with this - I've got a couple of beech trees that I'm in a similar position with
 
Messages
129
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168
Location
North GA
#4
So this other side is pretty bad. Guy at the nursery said it just suffered frost damage, but looks much more serious to me. Does anyone have an idea of what this is?
IMG_20180126_130157.jpg
 

0soyoung

Masterpiece
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3,873
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5,333
Location
Anacortes, WA
USDA Zone
8b
#6
It was damaged - a strip of bark got torn away somehow (raccoon scratching?) several years ago. It has healed over, but because the tissue is so much younger the bark is thinner than on the rest of the trunk. It doesn't appear to be punky meaning I don't see any wrinkling of this new tissue, that would indicate cambium death. So, I bet the black stuff is just smut that will easily come off with a fresh water tooth brush scrub. Maybe 2 tablespoons of 3% hydrogen peroxide in a quart of water will help.

But, yes you will want to keep this to the back of your composition.
 
Messages
129
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168
Location
North GA
#7
OK thanks so much for clearing that up and putting my mind at ease. The black had me nervous.
 
Messages
129
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168
Location
North GA
#8
Dug into this today. Cut back as much roots as I could, but again ran out of time, rest will have to wait until tomorrow.

After really looking at the top branching I realized there wasn't really much up there worth layering off, so I just cut off the thick trunks.

IMG_20180223_133646.jpg IMG_20180223_134533.jpg IMG_20180223_135921.jpg IMG_20180223_152148.jpg IMG_20180223_155343.jpg

Have to finish raking out all the rest of the old nursery dirt and see how far up I can go underneath.
 
Messages
755
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639
Location
Richmond, VA
USDA Zone
7a
#12
Really like the nebari on this, very cool! The damage on the trunk could be sunscald.
 
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726
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785
Location
Grants Pass, Oregon, USA
USDA Zone
7
#15
Nice maple, but I think you need to reduce it more. What is the finished height of the tree to be? Figure that first and reduce the trunk to about two thirds of that and then grow out the top. As is you are staged to make a fairly large tree. Your leader should grow until it blends with the trunk and then cut again to bring the taper up in stages. Rule of thumb is six inches tall per inch of trunk diameter. So a three inch trunk will make an eighteen inch tree, cutting back to twelve and growing six inches of upper branches and canopy.
This is not cast in stone, but a good go by when setting up the tree for future.
 
Messages
129
Likes
168
Location
North GA
#16
Yeah you know after sitting back and looking at this image, I thought I should have cut some of those longer branches back more, but - I do want to make it a good bit taller. I know the standard rule is 1:6 , trunk to height. But I really am more interested in creating something along the lines of 1:9 or 1:10, or even more. I think you see those proportions much more often in nature, and am hoping it will give this tree a more natural feel, like a real tree.
 
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1,361
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1,882
Location
Belgium
#18
Most of the time I like to establish the roots first before working on the top so the top part has maximal power to produce the roots. But what nice find is this... Besides the scarred back this is best nursery stock I've seen...