Stratification Advice

Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Location
Wigan
Hi guys, new here to Bonsai nut. Ive got a few plants I've grown from seed that seem to be flourishing quite well, maybe cause of the fantastic Summer we've all enjoyed.

I bought most of my seeds that don't require stratification but I somehow ended up with some Chinese Juniper seeds (late night shopping should be avoided) I didn't want to wait to grow things but here I am.

So I soaked my seeds for 48 hours and discarded the non viable ones and put them in a ziplock bag. After checking on them nearly 3 weeks later the wet paper has gone a bit mouldy and got bits of red? IMG_20180829_142923.jpg

Should I change the paper? Or is it okay for a while. I just don't want a bag of mess in the bottom of my fridge after 3 months.
 

Attachments

AlainK

Masterpiece
Messages
3,690
Reaction score
6,016
Location
Orléans, France, Europe
USDA Zone
9A
I think the "bits of red" is not a good sign, it's probably fungus beginning to develop.

I (-I-) would take them off the paper, rinse them in cold water with a little chlorine, then let them dry out for a day.

Then, if you want to statify seeds, put them in an appropriate mix : I usually use something like 50% coarse sand and 50% peat and a pinch of charcoal. Next, I put the whole thing in a ziplock bag that stays in the fridge (3-5° ) for a couple of months (2 to 5, depending on the species).

The only seeds I first grew in wet paper were annual "flowering" plants in March/April. More survived when directly planted in compost/soil mix.

For such seeds as conifers or deciduous that are native to temperate climates (when there are a few days below 0°), sowing them in a pot or cup and letting them overwinter can give very good results too.

Moist paper method is no good for junipers.

Wigan? Greater Manchester, UK?
 
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Location
Wigan
Okay, I thought the mould on the paper was a bad sign myself. Took them out and gave them a good wash. Good job Ive got a hot tub and had some chlorine granules to hand. I can see some of the seeds starting to crack open down the sides. Hopefully that's a good sign, I know it might be a bit early to be getting excited. But I'm still excited.
 
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Location
Wigan
Yes, Greater Manchester area. Sorry, forgot to add that in my original reply.

Also thank you for the advice. #thumbsupemoji
 

AlainK

Masterpiece
Messages
3,690
Reaction score
6,016
Location
Orléans, France, Europe
USDA Zone
9A
I know it might be a bit early
Much too early!

Most trees that need a period of dormancy to sprout in the spring. The end of August is much too late.

At most, they could perhaps "survive" if you keep them indoors at a low temperature (day-night, smthg like 13-5) with lots of light, but they'd be very weak.

I'm afraid there is very little chance that one survives... Sorry :oops:

I may be wrong: this summer never seems to end. We only had 20° today, and light showers of rain (maybe 04 mm in twenty-four hours - in the past three weeks) but it will get back to very dry and sunny, with temps growing up to 29° for the week to come. Very unusual (records broken). So we'll probably have to learn with a different pattern of seasons....

Try! :cool:
 
Last edited:

TN_Jim

Omono
Messages
1,309
Reaction score
1,282
Location
Nashville TN
USDA Zone
7a
Okay, I thought the mould on the paper was a bad sign myself. Took them out and gave them a good wash. Good job Ive got a hot tub and had some chlorine granules to hand. I can see some of the seeds starting to crack open down the sides. Hopefully that's a good sign, I know it might be a bit early to be getting excited. But I'm still excited.
Not sure about chlorine granuals...

I have treated seeds via 5% bleach/water soak for 5 min...sterile counters, tools, etc..
 

Leo in N E Illinois

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
6,421
Reaction score
11,373
Location
on the IL-WI border, a mile from ''da Lake''
USDA Zone
5b
I would just store the seed, as you have it, on moist paper towels, in the refrigerator until the appropriate planting time in spring. I've had a fair number of different species of seed sprout over the winter, most will just send out a root a short distance, then wait, dormant until they are planted out in spring. This would be your best bet.

By the way, some of the USA native junipers need a cold dormancy, followed by a warm dormancy, followed by a second cold dormancy. They don't germinate until the second year. Or some germinate the first year, the rest germinate the second year. I'm not clear on what the pattern is for Chinese juniper.
 

Wires_Guy_wires

Masterpiece
Messages
2,090
Reaction score
2,986
Location
Netherlands
Juniperus chinensis germinates here without dormancy as long as temperatures at night drop below 25 degrees C.
Seeds I've sown (without soaking) 3 weeks ago are popping up like mushrooms this week.
More than expected even.. I am encountering a serious pot shortage.

I'm starting to think they don't always need stratification.
 

Similar threads


Top Bottom