Subalpine Fir (Abies lasiocarpa) progression

Hartinez

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Nice! Glad the pot showed. Really sets the tree off. The lean is very nice, that with the crossing deadwood make for a lovely tension in the image. Is that first branch on the left styled as another trunk?
 

PiñonJ

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Nice! Glad the pot showed. Really sets the tree off. The lean is very nice, that with the crossing deadwood make for a lovely tension in the image. Is that first branch on the left styled as another trunk?
Yes, it’s a secondary apex. The whole tree is a little disheveled after the winter. I’ll prune and re-wire in the fall.
 

Colorado Josh

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I did not know! But thank you for the detailed response! If you ever get the opportunity to collect up north near hopewell lake, there are a ridiculous amount of stunted, matured and weathered Douglas fir and engleman spruce.
Hopewell is a wonderful place! My grandfather was a campground host up there for a number of years. I would go visit him every year for a week after all the tourists had gone home.
 

Hartinez

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Hopewell is a wonderful place! My grandfather was a campground host up there for a number of years. I would go visit him every year for a week after all the tourists had gone home.
I LOVE it up there. Hoping to get up there at some point during this lockdown.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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Question,
I should just look up the answer (in Dirr's) but do Abies (Firs) air layer or root from cuttings with any degree of success? Or are they like Pines, generally reluctant to impossible to root, except for the small handful of cultivar specific exceptions?
 

PiñonJ

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Question,
I should just look up the answer (in Dirr's) but do Abies (Firs) air layer or root from cuttings with any degree of success? Or are they like Pines, generally reluctant to impossible to root, except for the small handful of cultivar specific exceptions?
The only conifers I’ve heard of being reliably air-layered are juniper and deciduous (i.e. larch). I think other genera have much lower success rates, take longer and require foliage below the layer on the same branch to keep the roots alive. Sorry, I don’t have information specific to Abies and I haven’t tried air layering conifers yet, though there is a one-seed juniper in my landscape with beautifully compact foliage that I want to try.
 
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The only conifers I’ve heard of being reliably air-layered are juniper and deciduous (i.e. larch). I think other genera have much lower success rates, take longer and require foliage below the layer on the same branch to keep the roots alive. Sorry, I don’t have information specific to Abies and I haven’t tried air layering conifers yet, though there is a one-seed juniper in my landscape with beautifully compact foliage that I want to try.
Alpine firs WILL airlayer reasonably well, but it usually takes 2 to 3 seasons min. in my experience. In the wild, in the subalpine, they sometimes spread via air layering rather than seed. But it is a slow process. In my experience, the easiest (and quickest) evergreens to airlayer are western red cedars, yellow cedars, and yews.
 
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