Take a crack at identifing these two trees

Tachigi

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Found these two trees while scouting a mountain for future collection yesterday and we also collecting some blackberries for a pie:D, no sense coming back empty handed. When I got home I pulled out my Peterson's guide and came up blank.

The first is what I believe is a maple from the seed. The seed represents a black maple, however the leaves don't indicate the same. Leaves are slightly larger than a quarter.

The second I have know clue. It was a stand alone tree on top of this extremely wind blown mountain. Meaning that I didn't find any others of this species anywhere on my way up or anywhere else on the top. It had multiple trunks that were mildly contorted. Smooth grayish bark. The leaves all were quarter size. This tree was under-storied in a set of Mulberries and in the shade.

Any guess?
 

Tachigi

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(note to self) I really need to remember to post the pictures before submitting
 

rlist

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#1 Dunno.
#2 Betula of some sort I would guess...

Jim Lewis at IBC would nail both in about 2 minutes if nobody here gets close enough for you.
 
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Nigel Black

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Tomchigi,

I'm going to let the the second one roll around in my head for a while until the vague sense of recognition kicks in.

The first one is problematic because any species of Acer I can think of with trifoliate leaves doesn't have that elongated embryo. Are you sure it is a Maple? There are plenty of species of trees that have a samara form of fruit.

I will have to refer to Dirr's Manual (A must have title for tree freaks, plant nerds and anyone suffering from Phylla-philia)
I'll report back if I find anything.

Nigel
 
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Brent

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The first is probably Boxelder, Acer negundo. It has atypical Acer leaves that are compound, but typical Acer winged seeds. Don't know about the second, but try looking up some Ribes sp, gooseberry.

Brent
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Nigel Black

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Brent, what about those odd elongated embryos (I sound like a stuck record) are those typical of A. negundo?

Nigel
 

BigBill

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id have to say the 1st is an acer negundo as well... the house down the street has a few. no clue on the 2nd one
 

Tachigi

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Thanks Brent, you nailed that one. Those are seeds most definately. Out of curiosity anyone tried this species for material. I saw one image that was pretty nice of Acer negundo as a informal upright.
 

tom tynan

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Tom:

I am in agreement with Brent on the second tree being some type of Ribes sp.or gooseberry.
Based on the leaf shape and the look of the branches - these wild currant have new growth in the form of canes. That is what I am seeing to the right of your photo. I am posting my alpine currant - not the clearest picture or best background - but the leaves are similar. I am wondering what kind of base you found in that tree ?? These currant look best in spring; tube-like flowers and then small leaves. Once the heat of summer hits - they start to look a bit shaggy; very prone to fungal problems as well. This is the only one I have; the deadwood is very dense for a deciduous tree/bush.

Tom Tynan
 

koyote1

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That cedar mulch makes it look like a bowl of sticks with a tree growing out of it.
 

tom tynan

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Koyote: The cedar mulch is pretty ugly to look at no doubt - but it does keep the base of the tree from drying out during the heat of summer. When the tree dries out - it seems more prone to powdery mildew, etc. Something else more visually appealing could be used I guess - but the cedar mulch does the job for me. Another picture of the currant base without the offending mulch.

Hey Tom: Just wondering if you think the leaves are similar from what you found on the mountain...
 

Tachigi

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Tom its kind of hard to tell from your picture (i.e. background, distance ) It appears that the leaf edges are cut on yours. I found this true in every image I found with gooseberry. To be honest I'm a bit frustrated trying to identify. So I'm going to try and take a hike up the hill today and take another picture of the tree as a whole and the inspect the leaves. Maybe I got an odd bunch that didn't have a cut edge.
 

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