Tanuki Experiment: Which species to use?

Grungo

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Went beach combing today for tanuki materials. Found this excellent piece of pine that I just have to turn into something.

I know that tanuki are traditionally made with conifers, but the exaggerated hollows on this piece scream deciduous to me.

So my question is, Which species of tree does this remind you of? What would you use for a scion?54F0291C-AC2D-4A59-AF82-6C316C0293A7.jpegD282E889-904C-43C7-AC73-AF6594C675FB.jpeg
 

River's Edge

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Using the term scion is probably confusing many. Tanuki involves creating a channel to insert a sapling into, allowing it to grow within the channel and appear to be part of the deadwood portion of the tanuki.
The way you worded your inquiry seems to lean in the direction of seeking advice on a deciduous species. In my opinion that might be more suited to planting in a hollow. Mimicking many shrubs and trees that begin life on the remains of larger trees.
Given the assorted glazes and dyes in the background it appears you may have an artistic bent and have an adventurous approach to broaden the meaning of Tanuki.
Typically a slender sapling is chosen that can be fit into a narrower channel that changes direction to look like a surviving live vein on the outside of the driftwood. Upright juniper species work well for this as they naturally appear in contorted branching and have contrasting bark to complement the driftwood. Perhaps a collected Rocky Mountain Juniper, nursery cypress or juniper.
What do you have in mind for this piece of deadwood, the carving you have already done seems to suggest a plan in mind?
 

Canada Bonsai

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I know that tanuki are traditionally made with conifers, but the exaggerated hollows on this piece scream deciduous to me.

So my question is, Which species of tree does this remind you of?

Ume

Not something i would do myself, but with some creativity, smart planning, and good carving i think you should be able to create something interesting

(sorry can’t recall where all these pics are from)
 

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Grungo

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Using the term scion is probably confusing many. Tanuki involves creating a channel to insert a sapling into, allowing it to grow within the channel and appear to be part of the deadwood portion of the tanuki.
The way you worded your inquiry seems to lean in the direction of seeking advice on a deciduous species. In my opinion that might be more suited to planting in a hollow. Mimicking many shrubs and trees that begin life on the remains of larger trees.
Given the assorted glazes and dyes in the background it appears you may have an artistic bent and have an adventurous approach to broaden the meaning of Tanuki.
Typically a slender sapling is chosen that can be fit into a narrower channel that changes direction to look like a surviving live vein on the outside of the driftwood. Upright juniper species work well for this as they naturally appear in contorted branching and have contrasting bark to complement the driftwood. Perhaps a collected Rocky Mountain Juniper, nursery cypress or juniper.
What do you have in mind for this piece of deadwood, the carving you have already done seems to suggest a plan in mind?
Perhaps I used the wrong term. I’ve done one tanuki before, and in my research the young sapling used to join the deadwood was sometimes referred to as a scion, same as in approach grafting. If this is confusing I apologize.

What I’d like advice on is a species of sapling to use with this deadwood. I know that junipers and cypress are recommended for tanuki, but this deadwood doesn’t give me an impression that fits with those species. It makes me think of an old broken deciduous tree.
So I’m seeking any thoughts on what species might work the best to enhance that image.
 

Grungo

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Ume

Not something i would do myself, but with some creativity, smart planning, and good carving i think you should be able to create something interesting

(sorry can’t recall where all these pics are from)
These are amazing! I like the contrast between bright flowers and dark wood.

I know tanuki can be polarizing, but I think of it as a fun project to do while I let the “natural“ trees grow.
 

Arnold

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Junipers are the best option, get Itoigawa or Kishu, you have to carve a chanel then atach the live juniper, it will grow and will look like a live vein in an old juniper from the mountains

2-25-2016-9-35-39-AM.jpg


2-25-2016-9-35-55-AM.jpg
 

sorce

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Don't do It!

Welcome to Crazy!

Sorce
 
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