Texas persimmon advice?

CreekChalk

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My neighbor was doing some clearing and I picked these two up. I know it’s not the time for it but I am going to try to save them. Other than shade and misting, what else would you do to help them survive?

They are potted in spag. How much more foliage should I remove, they were about 5ft tall. I would estimate I removed about 80% of the foliage already.

Any advice?
 

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sorce

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Best to just wait it out now. Likely with a plan to airlayer them in the future if they live.

Sphagnum moss kills trees overwinter here.

The problem is if not kept wet it becomes hydrophobic, and when kept wet enough it is too wet.

Sorce
 

CreekChalk

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Best to just wait it out now. Likely with a plan to airlayer them in the future if they live.

Sphagnum moss kills trees overwinter here.

The problem is if not kept wet it becomes hydrophobic, and when kept wet enough it is too wet.

Sorce
Why do you suggest airlayers in the future?

Don’t get me wrong I’m going to airlayer others of the same species (I have 10k+ growing on my property), I’m just curious what you see that suggests airlayer in these two in particular.
 

sorce

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Why do you suggest airlayers in the future?

Partly because I wouldn't waste time trying to regrow these bases.

Partly because changing the soil now would almost kill em sure, and if they live through sphagnum, these bases will probably be less worth efforts then, especially after the pains of trying to remove sphagnum from the roots, which seems is going to leave you much worse off than the beginning.

It's compounded waste of time.

The best thing to do, which has passed, would have been to layer them before they got pulled.
A lesser waste of time would've been cleaning up the base to "perfect", since not doing so didn't really keep them any safer.
A lesser waste of time would've been planting into proper soil.

But now since all these "wastes of time" are present, you are crossing your fingers to get back to square one, layering them before the "leave the ground".

This is a place where you will faster find better free material.

Learn, but don't be afraid to toss garbage to keep your space available for what your new eye is searching for.

Search "stack ranking" by @Brian Van Fleet, if we keep our spaces full of, and our hearts into junk, it keeps our attention from attaining better material. It keeps our eyes closed.

The fastest way to an excellent collection is to keep the door revolving. Make the collection the greater goal than any one tree.

Sorce
 

CreekChalk

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Partly because I wouldn't waste time trying to regrow these bases.

Partly because changing the soil now would almost kill em sure, and if they live through sphagnum, these bases will probably be less worth efforts then, especially after the pains of trying to remove sphagnum from the roots, which seems is going to leave you much worse off than the beginning.

It's compounded waste of time.

The best thing to do, which has passed, would have been to layer them before they got pulled.
A lesser waste of time would've been cleaning up the base to "perfect", since not doing so didn't really keep them any safer.
A lesser waste of time would've been planting into proper soil.

But now since all these "wastes of time" are present, you are crossing your fingers to get back to square one, layering them before the "leave the ground".

This is a place where you will faster find better free material.

Learn, but don't be afraid to toss garbage to keep your space available for what your new eye is searching for.

Search "stack ranking" by @Brian Van Fleet, if we keep our spaces full of, and our hearts into junk, it keeps our attention from attaining better material. It keeps our eyes closed.

The fastest way to an excellent collection is to keep the door revolving. Make the collection the greater goal than any one tree.

Sorce
That makes sense, thank you for the advice.
I just did all this yesterday, now I’m inclined to trash them and use the sphagnum to airlayer instead.

What would cleaning up the base to “perfect” look like? I didn’t cut back the large roots completely bc there was very little fine root mass and more importantly I have very little experience in general and even less with root work.
 

sorce

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What would cleaning up the base to “perfect” look like?

I'm not from camp "hack all roots", so I don't know for sure what you can get away with, and I certainly don't recommend camp 'hack all roots".

As I, obviously, see airlayers as a better way to make a better nebari, which you also ate controlling, you see, these old root masses demand so much work, they control us.

However, say that point, anything beyond an inch long without masses upon masses of feeder roots should be chopped back.
It's quite the same as a trunk chop.
Go hard, or you waste more time.

Don't trash em. You may boom with health, which may be key for future "mother plant" development.

Sorce
 

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