The “interesting things that showed up in my yamadori” thread.

Tycoss

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I have collected a number of conifers and deciduous shrubs in the Canadian Rockies and prairies. With the conifers I retain a fair bit of the original soil. Interesting little plants from these habitats frequently show up in this.
I know they compete with the trees, and most will probably find their way into accent pots or rock gardens when I’m sure the trees are established and I can mess around near the roots. In the meantime, I’ll share some pics. I know a lot of you have had similar experiences and I’d love to see your little surprises as well.
 

Tycoss

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In one of the places I have collected spruce and potentilla the ground is nearly covered with alpine bearberry, arctous alpina, it is related to kinnikinnik, but is deciduous. It has black berries, brilliant red fall colour and trails very low. I think it would make a great accent plant, since it looks distinctive and interesting in all seasons.BE57C9E2-8B8E-4C9A-8B6B-18A3609CB155.jpeg
Here you can see the little bell shaped flowers D25405A8-211A-4F56-AA21-449589F961B2.jpeg
New growth is a bit reddish too.D134116C-8C89-4071-9748-A7BD2D0D92F2.jpeg
I find the texture of the leaves very appealing.
 

Tycoss

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There have also been a few woody shrubs that came out of collected trees. First, dwarf spruce, betula nana. It came in as a piece of cut up root with a spruce. It then grew shoots and was put in it’s own pot. These turn whole mountainsides bright orange in the fall in some areas.AF336D2F-9479-4608-ACAB-B57870BEBAD4.jpeg
Next is a wolf willow, eleagnus communis that hitchhiked in with a buffalo berry bush:9DFFD294-F9ED-4E28-A1E1-CDE4BCAD529A.jpeg
 

Tycoss

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Allium textile, a tiny native onion, has shown up in a piece of soil collected with a Saskatoon Bush. They are strong, but edible.157BE2E4-0FF6-43CF-9F90-7BCECDF5D51C.jpeg
 
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