Tigerbark Ficus - Grown from cutting - How would you handle?

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This was grown from a cutting and repotted early this summer. Ive left is almost alone all year on the bench, had roots growing out of the pot midsummer. Just moved it inside into the grow room which is also my office so I cant go crazy with humidity, its at 45% right now and around 72 degrees. Should I keep growing it out or chop down to the first branch? 893B1C42-D7B2-48CB-8BD9-71E5754D26A7_1_105_c.jpeg


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Forsoothe!

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What's your goal? If your goal is to keep it this height and just refine it, then just keep tip pruning to keep it within a given profile and defoliate every June to reduce foliage size. You can wire to move branches around any time, but in fall for ~6 months works nicely.
 
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115
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Dubuque, Iowa
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What's your goal? If your goal is to keep it this height and just refine it, then just keep tip pruning to keep it within a given profile and defoliate every June to reduce foliage size. You can wire to move branches around any time, but in fall for ~6 months works nicely.

Not sure of the end goal yet, just enjoying the process, it was a small cutting early summer and grew a ton all summer. Was curious if I should keep as much foliage on throughout the winter or if now is a good time to reduce, you answered that ? I am somewhat limited on space with my current setup so weighing options. Was curious if someone might see something I'm not and appreciate the advice.
 

canoeguide

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If it were mine, I'd let it grow, and use that first branch as a sacrifice branch to thicken the base of the trunk.
 
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I'm still very new to all this but I have some ficus I recently moved indoors too. I'm not expecting the same type of growth under lights as I would get out side so I'm planning on just letting them go all winter then cutting back hard come spring/summer. I just want them to get as much energy as they can through the winter.

I can understand having limited space as well. I'm planning on just wiring the new growth straight up without shading out the lower foliage if I have to.

Again, I'm still very inexperienced and just thinking my way through the process.
 

Carol 83

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I wouldn't do anything drastic while it's inside for the winter. Wait until it's outside next spring/summer when it's growing vigorously. Cuttings root easily.
 

Forsoothe!

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Not sure of the end goal yet, just enjoying the process, it was a small cutting early summer and grew a ton all summer. Was curious if I should keep as much foliage on throughout the winter or if now is a good time to reduce, you answered that ? I am somewhat limited on space with my current setup so weighing options. Was curious if someone might see something I'm not and appreciate the advice.
Over winter I just want it to look nice and not get out of hand. There can be a certain amount of growth in the autumn that is positive and improves the look (refinement) and health of the tree that you don't get if you do heavy pruning going into fall in an office with sub-prime conditions. I'd only do heavy work on it in spring and early summer, and stick to tipping to control shape which I would do casually all winter, too, removing any buds that begin opening that threaten to spoil the shape by growing too long. That's the yearly cycle: Heavy work in spring when moved outdoors; regrows in summer; coasts thru winter, repeat ad infinitum. By heavy work I mean cutting back for shape and repotting in May, denuding in 3rd week of June. (Repotting every year for high growth or every other year to maintain size and refine canopy.) Wire anytime with loose loops and heavier caliber wire, but only for long periods over winter.

Lots of tropicals that are from dry, hot summer regions, have a good amount of refining growth in cooler and wetter weather of autumn where they add leaves at the ends of twigs before (later) extending the tip with a long-internode that would terminate in flowers along that new long internode. Figs most often, or most figs often have clusters of figs that they ripen at the base of the leaves growing at the tips, so the long-internode growth pauses for ripening. Remove the figs by pinching between the thumb and forefinger and spinning it to resume growth (extention).
 

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