Tips on improving the overall shape of a Prunus Incisa

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Do you want a bigger trunk? Wait a year or two to cut.
You want to maintain the same silhouette? Cut back to a pair of short branches a few inches down the branches. (green)
Cut back your main branches to just about half the length of the distance nebari - splitup. (red)
You want the crown to be smaller? Cut back to the last viable bud on your main branches. You might leave two, just in case. (Yellow)

My option would be the last. They backbud rather good. I notice that growth wasn't great this year. It might be a good option to let it grow full power until next fall.
 
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ajm55555

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Thank you Dirk. I definitely want to maintain the same silhouette. I don't want a bigger nebari/trunk and the size of the canopy is just fine.
I'll rather develop the existing branches and add more ramification.
I could see some branches are a bit too long and your suggestions are really helpful. Thanks!
 
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I've got one myself and it is a joy in spring to see the early flowers. I don't keep it as a bonsai, it is more an accent plant, i see you do to. Actually my daughter (7y) does the cutting.
 

Random User

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I'd do one of three things;

1. Trade it to a member who has some material you really want.

2.Trim it like Dirk suggested at the green markers and see what the tree gives you in 5 years.

3. Or leave it alone and enjoy a tree that most people would be quite happy with. I think if you leave it be, and try to encouraging back budding, the tree will fill out a bit more to please the eye, but at the detriment of flowering and fruit production.

Sweet little tree... I think you'll see a change in the lower trunk bark in the next few years as well.
 

ajm55555

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I'd do one of three things;

1. Trade it to a member who has some material you really want.

2.Trim it like Dirk suggested at the green markers and see what the tree gives you in 5 years.

3. Or leave it alone and enjoy a tree that most people would be quite happy with. I think if you leave it be, and try to encouraging back budding, the tree will fill out a bit more to please the eye, but at the detriment of flowering and fruit production.

Sweet little tree... I think you'll see a change in the lower trunk bark in the next few years as well.
1. is not an option ;-)
I'm considering 2. and 3.
I'll pass on the compliment to the tree :) Thanks!
 

M. Frary

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the detriment of flowering and fruit production
I have a couple Hawthorne and an azalea.
I could care less about flowers or fruit. I want them to look like trees first then if they flower great. If not so what?
 

ajm55555

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Spider mites are terrible. It seems like they're not satisfied until the tree is dead.
I didn't want to use chemicals so I tried with water and dish soap, which seems to work if you're consistently spraying at regular intervals for some time. Maybe that "some time" was not sufficient.
If you skip some spraying they pick up again quickly.
 

defra

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Not good news. The tree lost many branches this summer both for lack of water at times and a spider mite attack.
I will post a few pics ASAP.
I don't know what to do with this tree. It's really beautiful when it flowers but it doesn't seem so strong to me.
I lost branches on mine too due to wireing and i went prety hard on the roots when repotted i agree they are tree's to take it slow with

Spidermites suck
I spray with a biological anti mite spray works like a charm and didnt see any negative reaction of my trees wich were treated maybe something to keep in mind !
 

ajm55555

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I lost branches on mine too due to wireing and i went prety hard on the roots when repotted
I didn't wire this year but lost many branches anyway. This species seems to decide without hesitation which branches need to stay and which not.
Also, I repotted 2 years ago, pruned the roots but not heavily and didn't have any dead branch because of the repotting itself.
 

defra

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Yes!
The base is deff worth saving it might even improve movement and taper if growth pushes out lower chop it back and try to slip pot in spring to a slightly bigger pot to give the roots some aditional space!
 

ajm55555

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Yes!
The base is deff worth saving it might even improve movement and taper if growth pushes out lower chop it back and try to slip pot in spring to a slightly bigger pot to give the roots some aditional space!
Sorry if I forgot to include you in my previous reply @defra! Thanks for the tips. I'll give it one more try.
I think I'm more a Japanese maple guy!
 

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