Tired of Willow Oaks yet? Here's yet another one

Jay Wilson

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Well, I know I haven't got much (any) good stuff to post but we need some trees posted.

This willow oak has been chopped a couple of times while it was still in the ground and I collected it this past spring. It's basicly just a so so trunk and most, if not all of the branches will have to be taken off and regrown.
The low branch on the left is a sacrifice branch that I'll let grow wild for a while to try to thicken the lower trunk.

I know there's not much to say about this tree, but I feel the need to post trees.
Thanks,
Jay
 

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Bonsai Nut

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I have to admit - I am not at all familiar with a "willow oak". Are they tropicals? Their leaves seem rather large to me; can you defoliate them mid-season?
 

Jay Wilson

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Hey B'nut,
Willow oak is as far as I know a temperate tree. The leaves are rather large in the wild and I've never defoliated one yet, but I have a couple that the leaves have reduced to an inch or so just through trimming back several times in one season.
Jay
 

Tachigi

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Greg, Willow Oak grow as far north as New Jersey that I have personally seen. I have been told that they are as far north as Mass. Here in PA. they line the banks of every river, creek and stream.

Jay, This will be a good one. As some good movement in the trunk. When are you going to start cutting back the branches on the top portion?
 

Jay Wilson

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Tom,
I probably won't do much of anything this year. It didn't have many roots after collection (see pictures), so I'll just let it grow this year. The only trimming /cutting I'll do is on the few branches I might want to keep just to keep them from growing too large.

Next spring, I'll take a look at the roots and start working on the nebari (if it's strong enough) and probably start the branch work as well.
Thanks,

Jay
 

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Rick Moquin

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It definitely has some good potential. The nebari on the other hand is going to be a while, but that is pretty common on collected trees. If you plan on repotting next spring then I would suggest you do a ground layer in hope of developing some roots as the majority that are there I can't see in the tree's future.

Score the trunk on its circumference for an inch above the last large root, apply rooting hormone, wrap in spagnum moss and burry in regular growing medium. 2 years from now when you go to repot, you should be able to sever the parent system.
 

JasonG

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Hey Jay,

Thanks for posting this guy..... I like it and think that the trunk is good. Like everyone else I am not familiar with this species but it is a good looking tree.
Ah, there was plenty of root there, what are you worried about? :)

This will be a good tree to watch you develop over the coming years. You should collect me one and we can trade for something???????? Hmmmm, just a thought!

See Ya
 

Jay Wilson

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It definitely has some good potential. The nebari on the other hand is going to be a while, but that is pretty common on collected trees. If you plan on repotting next spring then I would suggest you do a ground layer in hope of developing some roots as the majority that are there I can't see in the tree's future.

Score the trunk on its circumference for an inch above the last large root, apply rooting hormone, wrap in spagnum moss and burry in regular growing medium. 2 years from now when you go to repot, you should be able to sever the parent system.
Thanks Rick,
I think you're on to something here. Not only for getting the nebari better, but I also feel that the trunk is a bit too long before the first branches (or where I'm likely to get branches) so layering it as you suggest would shorten the trunk and maybe make a better image. Thanks for your input!

I actually did as you suggested on another tree a few weeks ago.

Jay
 

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Jay Wilson

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This will be a good tree to watch you develop over the coming years. You should collect me one and we can trade for something???????? Hmmmm, just a thought!
Yeah, I figure it will take 6 or 8 years to develop and get into a bonsai pot.

Trading...... I suspect the willow oaks would do just fine up in the great northwest. Your pines and junipers would probably not do as well down here darn it!

Jay
 

wahoo172

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trading oaks

Jay,
I don't want to hijack your thread, but I wanted to respond to Jason's offer to trade. I think you could grow Acer Palmatum here in Lakeland. I know I am doing it, so you should be able to also. Jason has some nice AP's on his site!

George
 

Jay Wilson

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Hey George,
I had forgotten that Jason had trees other than conifers. Maybe in a couple of years i'll have some florida stuff to trade with him.
Thanks,

Jay
 

Jay Wilson

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Update

Two years later. Some progress but still a few years out.

It's been two years in this grow box and I'd suspect the roots are in good shape. I think I'll do as Rick suggested and try a ground layer to improve the nebari.

I still don't know about the low branch on the left.... It started as a sacrifice branch to help thicken the trunk for improved taper. So far it hasn't done much. I've decided to train it as a keeper branch but I still have the option of removing it later if need be.

I've managed to chase the branching back toward the trunk some...I'll continue to work on it this year.

Comments are welcome.
 

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Martin Sweeney

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Jay,

I like what you are doing with willow oak as seen on this thread and at least on other here on BonsaiNut. I certainly have access to many right here in my own yard, I think I need to start digging some and joining in the fun. You are one of the few people I have seen using this plant as a subject for bonsai and doing well with it.

Regards,

Martin
 

Jay Wilson

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Thanks Martin!
I dig mine from my own yard too... It's nice to be able to do some work on them while they are in the ground and growing strong.

You're right about willow oak and bonsai. Don't see much of it. I'm not sure if there's something wrong with them, or people just haven't found them yet.

I'm having fun with them.
 

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JasonG

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Good work Jay!

Man, I want to get one of these..... I like what you are doing with them, and the fact you are just getting these in your yard is very cool. The roots seem to be comming out nicely as well.

PM me, lets talk..... :)

Jason
 

Jay Wilson

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Jason,
Yeah, I'll see about sending you one.....Might have to wait until next year to get a decent one.

It is pretty cool having some stock growing on my own place :)

That pic of the radial roots is just a teaser. It's the only one like that so far. All my other trees aren't so nice.
I have found that if I cut the taproot with a sawsall, it does encourage lots of new radial roots.

I'll PM you soon.
 

Kirk

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I'm so glad to see some Quercus phellos in training. They are all over the Piedmont region of GA. The one growing in my mother's front yard is registered as the largest tree in the county with a circumference of 20 ft at chest height. They definitely don't want to stay small if left to their own devices but it has smaller leaves/acorns than most of the oak species.
 

Kirk

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Got any pics?
I'll post some asap. I'm new to the site and have to figure out how to download the pics. My talents do not extend into the techno realm.

The tree is impressive. They grow to be some of the largest oaks in the state, especially if they have a steady source of water.

Kirk
 

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