Toyo Nishiki in Flower

fredtruck

Omono
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This is my Toyo Nishiki flowering quince. The basis for this tree first appeared in 2000 as suckers from a cutting I bought from Brent. I did a division in 2001. The tree has been on its own since then.

In 2008, I began ground layering in Toyo Nishiki Red plants. Since it takes about 50 years for red flowers to appear spontaneously according to Brent, I decided to do it this way since I will not be around that long. The reds I ground layered in are thoroughly knitted into the tree now.

One thing I think is interesting about this bonsai is that it is in the sinuous style. This style was something the tree just naturally grew into. Every couple of years it generates another trunk.

I hope you enjoy my bonsai's display of flowers.
 

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Jason

Shohin
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Beautiful. It's nice to see one of these after 10 years of work....I like the pot. Was it difficult to get it in this shallow of a pot?
 

fredtruck

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No, it was very easy because I trained it from the start to have a very shallow root system. Additionally, the tree itself never developed a deep root system, even when I had it in deeper pots early in its development. It just sent its roots out to the edges.

I'm glad you like the tree.
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Beautiful photo! Love the flowers against the black background. Gotta love that touch of spring while things are still trying to wake up outside.
 

fredtruck

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Absolutely. For me, flowering bonsai like the quinces or the mumes are the breath of spring. Life begins again!
 

bonsaiTOM

Mame
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fredtruck,

Where are you growing your beautiful flowering quince? Climate zone? I would love to try one but we have brutal winters here.

General question. Do they do well under lights (for 5 months) and relocate back outdoors when it warms up?

My bougies bring late winter, early spring flowers. I'm lovin' it. :)
 

fredtruck

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I'm in zone 5. We also have brutal winters here, but probably not so harsh as yours. Quince need a period of dormancy. I have a passively solar heated space I use for winter storage. It doesn't freeze, but rarely goes over 45 F. in the winter. The sun comes in through very large windows with southern exposure. There is a fan. All the trees I have in storage are watered regularly. I think flowering quince are supposed to be hardy to zone 5, but I have had a prunus mume, which is not hardy here, for 6 years with no problems.
 

fredtruck

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I thought it might be interesting to assemble photos I've taken over a 10 year period concerning the development of this toyo nishiki flowering quince.

Picture 1. In October of 2000 a twin trunk sucker appeared on this Toyo Nishiki cutting. Pictured here, in the late winter of 2001, I was about to divide it from its parent plant.

Picture 2. I took this picture at the end of May, 2003. The original twin trunks have doubled their size, and sent out surface roots from which another sucker has shot up. I have already put it in the pot it is in now in 2011.
 

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fredtruck

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Picture 3. By 2005, the Toyo Nishiki had assumed this form. The sinuous style has established itself and in this edited picture (which I did shortly after I took this picture), I am proposing a serious chop.

Picture 4. In 2006, some ramification had appeared.
 

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bonsaiTOM

Mame
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Thanks, I appreciate the info given, and I'm encouraged to give it a try!! :)

It looks like a bit more pruning will give you even more ramification.

Love your quince.
 

fredtruck

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Picture 5. In 2007, the tree bloomed over about half its area. Blooming spread originally from the first twin trunk suckers towards the back of the tree.

Picture 6, At this time, as this image shows, I ground layered in two cuttings that had red flowers only. The one that survived is at the very rear of the tree.
 

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fredtruck

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Picture 7. Here is my Toyo Nishiki as it is today, in 2011. I took this picture after cutting back the rear of the plant to redefine and clarify the shape. Ramification, though improving, still needs more work.
 

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Brian Van Fleet

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Great development, really like the idea of adding in red-flowering plants to move it along! Don't you also have a big, stumpy J. Quince that Ron had for a while?
 

fredtruck

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Yes, I do. I took some pictures of it. It is flowering, but a little unevenly. The tree needs further development. Thanks for asking!
 
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