Transplanting Field Grown JBP

weetree3

Seedling
Messages
24
Reaction score
16
Location
DFW, Texas
I have been field growing a cork bark JBP for several years. It is 4"+ inches in diameter. I have the following questions:

1. what size root ball?
2. how much of the original soil should I remove around the roots?
3. Should I plant the pint in Boom's mix or go 100% pumice?
4. should I wait for the pine to go dormmate or dig now?
5. I am planning on leaving it in a large wood grow box for several years. We are moving and I don't want to leave the pine.
6. do I have a good change of being successful?

Sorry if this has been discussed before. I could not find any links.

Thank you.

Jon269561
 

weetree3

Seedling
Messages
24
Reaction score
16
Location
DFW, Texas
Bonsaieejit: Sorry but I don't know how to contact @Adair M for his input. I just don't post much and have followed your link to him, however, that where I get lost. Sorry to be such a newbie. Any direction would be much appreciated.
 

parhamr

Omono
Messages
1,438
Reaction score
4,709
Location
Portland, OR
USDA Zone
9a
1. what size root ball?
2. how much of the original soil should I remove around the roots?
3. Should I plant the pint in Boom's mix or go 100% pumice?
4. should I wait for the pine to go dormmate or dig now?
5. I am planning on leaving it in a large wood grow box for several years. We are moving and I don't want to leave the pine.
6. do I have a good change of being successful?
  1. I would aim for a root ball 12–16" in diameter and about 6–10" of depth
  2. I would ensure the root tips along the edges of the root ball are cleanly cut and then I would loosen and tease out field soil about 2–3 inches into the ball
  3. I vote for 100% pumice, screened to remove anything smaller than 1/16", but if you’re not worried about costs then go for the akadama-pumice-lava mix
  4. Dig in late winter or early spring before buds extend (swelling is okay), when your overnight lows are consistently above 45 degrees, and you’re not at risk of frost. If you’re moving soon then this is your last chance to dig—you want to do this during periods of root growth
  5. Perfect! Make it only as big as the roots need. Keep it shallow!
  6. Yes. Absolutely. Those needles are huge, the buds are strong, and the internode distances are large which all show it’s a happy, healthy, and very strong tree
 

Shibui

Masterpiece
Messages
2,861
Reaction score
5,425
Location
Yackandandah, Australia
USDA Zone
9?
I dig my field grown black pines from mid winter through to spring. Note our winters are mild - min temps go just below freezing.
I shake off the majority of the field soil them reduce roots to fit the pot. Top is pruned a little to compensate for some loss of roots but leave plenty of intact branch tips. Pot straight into my normal bonsai potting mix.
Trees then go on the nursery benches in full sun and watered regularly. Roots getting too dry can kill the tree though it may take many months to show.

This works for me in my climate but I am a long way from Texas.
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom