Tree ID help.

vp999

Sapling
Messages
33
Reaction score
27
Location
Washington DC
USDA Zone
7A
Hello all! I bought these yesterday but wasn’t sure exactly what kind it was, I know one is a pine but I’m not sure what kind and it does not look like my black pine. The other one I’m thinking a Hemlock? I bought it from an old gentleman who doesn’t speak much English. Thanks in advance. Tommy 49BD0A68-245F-4D3A-8B8A-185C4600F245.jpeg070980C2-F292-47A4-B12A-09DA8B8E92AD.jpeg07212AB8-7542-4E15-9F68-490CF01D5679.jpegEE9F39B6-30BF-4BD8-B7D7-2281C311CFA1.jpegEE9F39B6-30BF-4BD8-B7D7-2281C311CFA1.jpegD2A14056-7154-47B0-9F31-C1938373E422.jpeg
 

Attachments

vp999

Sapling
Messages
33
Reaction score
27
Location
Washington DC
USDA Zone
7A
I am waiting till spring to repot those 2. Seems like the gentleman whom I bought them from is using generic soil mixed with river rocks, definatley not your typical loose bonsai soil.
 

Shibui

Chumono
Messages
879
Reaction score
1,591
Location
Yackandandah, Australia
USDA Zone
9?
I agree with Charles. These trees have OPPOSITE branch pattern so they are probably metasequoia. Taxodium have alternate branch pattern.

The pine is definitely a 5 needle white pine but there are quite a number of species that are similar. It could be JWP but I don't know enough about how to differentiate between the different white pines to give any better ID for that one.
 

Vance Wood

Lord Mugo
Messages
13,118
Reaction score
14,511
Location
Michigan
USDA Zone
5-6
I agree with Charles. These trees have OPPOSITE branch pattern so they are probably metasequoia. Taxodium have alternate branch pattern.

The pine is definitely a 5 needle white pine but there are quite a number of species that are similar. It could be JWP but I don't know enough about how to differentiate between the different white pines to give any better ID for that one.
If you want to be technical about the J.White Pine it falls into the catagory of Miyajima, being grafted onto probably a balck Pine base.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
5,379
Reaction score
9,203
Location
on the IL-WI border, a mile from ''da Lake''
USDA Zone
5b
Metasequoia and Taxodium are somewhat related. Metasequoia likes almost as much water as Taxodium. I have a Metasequoia submerged most of the summer in water. I'll take it out of the water now.

Styling the two for bonsai is very similar. Though I am pretty sure nobody outside of China knows from first hand experience what the ''natural'' form of Metasequoia is, except from photos, since the first Metasequoia planted in the west did not get here until after WW2. So the "flat top" usually recommended for bald cypress is probably not the right source for Metasequoia.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
5,379
Reaction score
9,203
Location
on the IL-WI border, a mile from ''da Lake''
USDA Zone
5b
My Metasequoia stay outside in my zone 5b winters. I take them off the bench, out of the pan of water, set them on the ground and forget them. They are very hardy, and mine are still in plastic pots.

My japanese white pines I also winter outdoors. I do move them to a shady spot, north side of a fence.
 

vp999

Sapling
Messages
33
Reaction score
27
Location
Washington DC
USDA Zone
7A
Thank you! I have a patio with a clear roof in the back so I think I will move all of my outdoor tree under it to be away from the snow and such, do you guys think this would be a good idea or just leave them where they are uncovered?
 

Leo in N E Illinois

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
5,379
Reaction score
9,203
Location
on the IL-WI border, a mile from ''da Lake''
USDA Zone
5b
Put your winter hardy cactus under cover - they hate being cold and wet.

Most trees need water over winter, I leave mine in the yard, to get snow and rain, so that I don't have to water. I want a winter break from watering. If you put them under cover, you will need to check on water.
 

Similar threads


Top Bottom