Trident dead wood

Jason

Shohin
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So, I've been growing tridents in the ground for a few years but I got impatient and went and purchased a couple trunks with quality nebari and larger trunk diameter. I've been feeling like a kid with a new toy. Now that I've had the material for a few days I've realized that a couple of my unfinished stumps have large cuts with exposed dead wood and some "sub stumps" that are entirely or mostly dead. In none of the cases does the dead wood extend all the way to the dirt or roots. Can any of you maple veterans help me out and explain to me how I preserve the wood after it's carved to fit my overall design (I've heard lime sulfur alone, mixed with ink or acrylic for aesthetics, miniwax...). Can I expect a well fed and cared for maple will eventually scar over on 3-4 inch areas of dead wood while in a training flat or pot (in my lifetime). I'm afraid I might need to learn about managing hollow trees. Anyone with experience they want to share? Where I live it rains a lot. What should be my biggest worries in dealing with a tree like this?
 

rockm

Imperial Masterpiece
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Tridents will callus over huge wounds IF they're given enough root run and left unpruned. Allow sacrifice shoots to grow all around the wound for a few years. That will help seal the hollow. The more root area they have the shorter the time it will take to close the wound. A container will slow the process, but it's not impossible.

I wouldn't try to lime sulphur deadwood on a maple to preserve it. The wood isn't as durable as conifer wood and it will look odd in the final design. Hollow-trunked deciduous trees don't have stark white wood deadwood. Deadwood doesn't last long in lowland forests. It rots away pretty quickly. Hollows on many deciduous trees typically have collars of callus tissue around them and darkened wood inside the hollow.
 

JayyVee

Seed
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Woodstock, GA
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So, I've been growing tridents in the ground for a few years but I got impatient and went and purchased a couple trunks with quality nebari and larger trunk diameter. I've been feeling like a kid with a new toy. Now that I've had the material for a few days I've realized that a couple of my unfinished stumps have large cuts with exposed dead wood and some "sub stumps" that are entirely or mostly dead. In none of the cases does the dead wood extend all the way to the dirt or roots. Can any of you maple veterans help me out and explain to me how I preserve the wood after it's carved to fit my overall design (I've heard lime sulfur alone, mixed with ink or acrylic for aesthetics, miniwax...). Can I expect a well fed and cared for maple will eventually scar over on 3-4 inch areas of dead wood while in a training flat or pot (in my lifetime). I'm afraid I might need to learn about managing hollow trees. Anyone with experience they want to share? Where I live it rains a lot. What should be my biggest worries in dealing with a tree like this?
Just to add to what rock said about using lime sulfur on deciduous trees - wood stains work well on these to darken the wood and give it that old/aged appearance (more like a rot as it would appear on most deciduous species). Lots of options with wood stains insofar as colors etc, to match the species you're working on. Lime sulfur suits conifers more where deadwood is dry mostly due to weather conditions and can last many many years (thus getting the bleached look).
 
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