Trunk In A Pot Episode 1: Elaeagnus/Silverberry

Cmd5235

Yamadori
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Does anyone have experience with silver berry? I feel like it’s an underutilized species for bonsai, and I’m curious about leaf reduction. It looks like I can get the internodes short enough
 

roberthu

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Does anyone have experience with silver berry? I feel like it’s an underutilized species for bonsai, and I’m curious about leaf reduction. It looks like I can get the internodes short enough
I am exploring a couple right now. Just got two nursery stock with nice trunk movement to test out. They are pretty common used in Japan and China. Supposedly easy to grow and develops quickly. I am going to keep mine in nursery pots until next spring to do heavy trunk chops and root pruning.
 

Forsoothe!

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Does anyone have experience with silver berry? I feel like it’s an underutilized species for bonsai, and I’m curious about leaf reduction. It looks like I can get the internodes short enough
It's not certainly hardy in Michigan.
 

defra

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i would have potted it deeper to work on the nebari as well.
i have a elaeagnus ebbingei evergreens variety leaves do reduce and the grow real fast.
Nice trunk have fun with it!
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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@Cmd5235 - Nice Elaeagnus. Pretty much all of the species of Elaeagnus can make beautiful bonsai. If you collected it near where you live in Pennsylvania it is probably NOT Elaeagnus pungens - the species most often called "silverberry". Elaeagnus pungens is not very winter hardy. Also E. pungens flowers in autumn, the others flower in spring.

You most likely have Elaeagnus umbellata, or Elaeagnus multiflora, umbellata is usually called autumn olive. Elaeagnus multiflora is usually called goumi, or natsugumi in Japanese. Both species are naturalized invasive species through out the eastern half of North America. The fruit of E. multiflora is much larger than E. umbellata and ripens earlier in the summer, where E. umbellata fruit ripens in autumn, Sept or October.

They all make decent bonsai. Leaves will reduce.

I love the fragrance of the flowers in spring.
 

defra

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@Cmd5235 - Nice Elaeagnus. Pretty much all of the species of Elaeagnus can make beautiful bonsai. If you collected it near where you live in Pennsylvania it is probably NOT Elaeagnus pungens - the species most often called "silverberry". Elaeagnus pungens is not very winter hardy. Also E. pungens flowers in autumn, the others flower in spring.

You most likely have Elaeagnus umbellata, or Elaeagnus multiflora, umbellata is usually called autumn olive. Elaeagnus multiflora is usually called goumi, or natsugumi in Japanese. Both species are naturalized invasive species through out the eastern half of North America. The fruit of E. multiflora is much larger than E. umbellata and ripens earlier in the summer, where E. umbellata fruit ripens in autumn, Sept or October.

They all make decent bonsai. Leaves will reduce.

I love the fragrance of the flowers in spring.
i have a elaeagnus ebbingei evergreens variety it flowers in fall right now it is in flowers and fruit are ripe in april i tried a couple because Leo said that they are eddible but i dont like the taste :p
 

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