Tsuga canadensis collected

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This tree was healthy enough but just not showing the prodigious growth that it has shown in years past. I read a thread on here about a white pine that responded well to "soji" or replacing the surface soil and I decided to go for it. I took it one step further and went ahead with my plan to un wire the tree from the pot and lift it out so that I could place some fresh aggregate on the bottom of the pot as well as I want to reveal and start working on some of the surface roots. The soil mass was well colonized or a solid form that kept it;'s shape when lifting out of the pot, but just didn't have the same bursting with growing root tips sort of look that it had during it's last repotting. I did use a fair amount of organics when I previously repotted, and although it still seemingly drains well, there was not a lot of visible airspace in the older soil. In retrospect I would use the spaghnum in the mix, but probably not the vermi-compost. I might try some kanuma next time as I think it might be the acidity forom the organics that the tree likes as well as the breathability of aggregate.

It seemed like over night the tree started pumping out new growth after the soji operation as adding some fresh soil to the bottom. I'm really glad I took the chance to perform the operation as I am in need of more back budding having lost a couple branches to a wandering toddler. Actually she was running full steam away from the sprinkler they were playing in, without looking where she was going. My fault really for not having a bench to take this up off the ground, but I have some plans in the works.
 
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Poor broken branch on the right of the second photo.. I really liked that one too. I think I may start cutting back the upper branches to let more light in and hopefully stimulate some fall backbudding.
 

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0soyoung

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It has just gained some character.

I may never forget one of Walter Pall's blog post about a spruce yamadori. He explained how it acquired its desirable character and then concluded with, "Thank you Moose!" :cool: Maybe your toddler-friend gets the nickname, Bullwinkle ;) even though her activity level sounds more like Rocket J. Squirrel.
 

River's Edge

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I got some back budding on the second branch from the top (not counting the apical sacrifice), but not on the branch above or below. Maybe I'll rotate to try and change the exposure; I think this branch had the most exposure and I'd really like some back-buds on the apex.
Good Idea. The rotation is important for backbudding and interior growth always. Thinning a tree to let the light into the interior makes a difference in much the same way.
 
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It has just gained some character.

I may never forget one of Walter Pall's blog post about a spruce yamadori. He explained how it acquired its desirable character and then concluded with, "Thank you Moose!" :cool: Maybe your toddler-friend gets the nickname, Bullwinkle ;) even though her activity level sounds more like Rocket J. Squirrel.
I do appreciate the sentiment, however the branch had character and now it is dead. The picture may look like there is still some green on it, but there is not :(..

Sub branch I should say.. the straight section is still ok.
 

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I do appreciate the sentiment, however the branch had character and now it is dead. The picture may look like there is still some green on it, but there is not :(..

Sub branch I should say.. the straight section is still ok.
Sorry. I presumed that was the case. I understand your frustration. Who wants a straight taperless branch?

Part of bonsai is making a tree that tells a story. This tree now has a story AND you will still make it be beautiful one day. Believe that and carry on!
 
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It's all good. I'm trying my best to induce some back-budding now, but I'm leaning towards eventually making some one point grafts to nail the structure just where I want it. Maybe I can draw inspiration from this dead broken branch to "naturalize" my design. I think next priority is getting the roots sorted out at the base and airlayering off the sacrifice so that I can both have another tree to play with and use it as a donor for grafts.

I do have this one to play with too.
The growth habit is subtly different on this one, but I have high hopes that it will develop well.
 

Vance Wood

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I couldn’t help myself and did some cut backs on the upper branches. I’m hoping for some fall back buds with this summer trimming.
Check out one of the Mugos I took to the 4Seasons show this weekend. This indicates what seems to be the habit of many of you guys to post pictures like this. I understand getting excited about something you have or something you have done and want to show it off. Posting pictures like this don't cut it. You have to at some point show the relevance of the entire tree to what you have done. If it is important to you it is not so difficult to throw together a decent picture. Don't tell me it is not a photo forum as an excuse. Don't kid yourself, the Bonsai Nut forum is made great by the efforts of great amateurs and professional bonsai people taking the time to answer questions and post pictures of great trees, and great techniques.


DSC_0669.JPG
 
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Fair enough Vance, you are right. I have a whole bag of excuses for why my photos rarely come out right, but I think the most likely is that I don’t take the time to get a tripod out and I am just shooting from the hip with my cell phone. This off season i’ll Be working on getting my benches set up and i’ll Try to work in a turntable w solid background so that I can expedite decent photo taking in the future.

We’ll see if these turned out any better. And i’ll Try and follow up with a couple upper branch details. I was worried that some of the upper branches were getting too thick as well as getting away from me, hence the impromptu hack-a-thon.
 

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Vance Wood

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You don't have to get a tripod, and/or lights and a mat-black background and I was afraid I was going to be accused of advocating thus, but some of these photos are useless, not just yours. If you are trying to portray a story it is incumbant that you do so accurately.
 
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A major step forward. Styling done by my brother in law, Marlon Carvalho, although I had creative input / final decision on cuts and placement. Now I just have to wait for spring to sprang. We might do some measurements so I can order a custom lotus pot from his potter in Sau Paulo, Cerâmica Izumi. The prices are very reasonable even with shipping as long as I can fill the shipment with some additional pots. Well I haven’t arranged a custom yet, but looking forward to it.3237F903-3938-42F2-B187-4E6CE3A164A5.jpeg
 
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I was going to airlayer the sacrifice off this year, but I think I might give it another two years to try and heal this wound. Should I cut into the lump forming to try and get a smoother scar? Or cut around the perimeter? Any advice appreciated.
 

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You sure are developing a nice looking bonsai, but I think it will be a lot longer than 2 years to heal that scar.

It is almost as wide as the trunk is thick. In my view, the caliper of the trunk will be about double what it is now by the time this wound is barked over. I think eastern hemlock thickens by about 10%/year. So, I think it will be at least 7 years, maybe a decade from now.

I'm thinking about whether this scar can be in the back or how it might be made or incorporated into a feature (e.g., making part of the sacrifice into a jin with a shari extending to this wound.
 
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Noted, it probably will take more than a couple years, but then healing the sacrifice will become more of an issue. I will take another look and consider extending a shari from the sacrifice. I’m not in a hurry, per se.. but I would like to work towards healing the wound.
What about that lump towards the top of the scar. I’m torn between cleaning it up and hoping it heals smoother a second time around or leaving it be as it is doing more to cover the wound than the callousing around the perimeter.
I do have some cut paste, I could lightly carve the perimeter and cover.
 
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I already wanted to try taking a drill to a straight section like this to have a connected hollow, but reluctant to get experimental on my favorite tree.
 

0soyoung

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What about that lump towards the top of the scar.
I was puzzled by that. If it is a protrusion, it definitely isn't helping.
I’m torn between cleaning it up and hoping it heals smoother a second time around or leaving it be as it is doing more to cover the wound than the callousing around the perimeter.
I do have some cut paste, I could lightly carve the perimeter and cover.
I'm not sold on these ideas (as opposed to leaving it be). My thinking is that if just keeping it damp (for months/years) makes it heal more quickly, just keeping the trunk damp would make it thicken faster - I've never seen persuasive evidence of this in my 'experimenting', so I scoff ;)).

I still think the key is getting more auxin and carbohydrate going on a path along the edge(s) of the lip - this is what is required for growth and I don't know how to do it other than maybe have a branch at the inside, upper edge of the wound = some fashion of approach grafting.


btw, if you follow the link, pix don't seem to exist in the post, but clicking on those icons takes me to each pic in an album of mine that is open to all members.
 

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Eastern hemlock heals extraordinarily fast. I've had 1" wounds heal up in two seasons. Is the wound you're going to create taking off the sacrifice going to be bigger than the one you're trying to heal?
 
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Eastern hemlock heals extraordinarily fast. I've had 1" wounds heal up in two seasons. Is the wound you're going to create taking off the sacrifice going to be bigger than the one you're trying to heal?
The sacrifice wound would be about a quarter of the existing chop wound. I was looking at the older photos and that lumpy callous from the top is growing and should cover the wound eventually. Not sure how pretty it will be, but it is making progress...
 
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