Twin Trunk Literati Lodgepole

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Shohin
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With the great thread going on the "windswept" white pine, I wanted to throw this tree out there. It touches on similar issues such as twin trunk literati, breaking the rules, and what is the best direction for this tree. A couple of notes:

My photo skills and camera suck - sorry.
This tree is a Lodgepole pine - pinus contorta. It is approximately 175 years old (by estimation counting growth on one of the lower limbs coming off the base - a 'la Herb Gustafson).
It is less than 6 months out of the ground in Eastern Oregon. It is 18 months from starting to style.
I have a pot on order from Darrell Walker for this tree. It will be repotted in late spring '08.
It is one of my favorite potensai. Mike Hagedorn dropped his jaw when he saw it, and asked if he could be the master to help me style it (I am honored, as now I have one tree I have actually had a master ask if they could help me on, vs. begging someone to help me with my trees), and of course I said yes.
It is 60" from the pot to the top of the "main" trunk". Most trees in this "style" I have seen in the ground are about 24" tall.

I was once told you should always name your trees. I have trees called Boon Ponderosa, Walter Ponderosa, Loch Ness, Big Hemlock. I call this one Dancing Flames. That is my vision. What do you all think???
 

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Graydon

Chumono
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I like it. I would love to see what direction goes in the future. I would have no idea what to do next. I suppose I would stare at it - a lot.

This represents another tree species that I have never seen in person (at least once my interest in bonsai established).

Cool.
 
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What a fantatstic piece of material! If Michael helps you work on it, you can be assured it will be well on the path to its highest potential.

I confess I'd be at a complete loss on this tree. I'd love to be there to record the sessions when you work on this one.
 

tom tynan

Mame
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Hey Rich...Very nice lodgepole pine...it will be interesting to see how Mike H. and yourself make this tree more compact. At 60" tall it will have to come down - but I guess with flexible upper branches this will not be a problem. Also...the natural "U" shape at the base of the trunks can be resolved by turning the tree so one trunk is slightly forward or behind the other.

As you wait patiently [probably killing you to wait !!] perhaps working on the strength of the tree ie. candle pruning, etc. can help with back-budding and reduce the "lions-tail" foilage so common on collected trees. At least you can experiment on some of the candles that are probably on branches that will be removed anyways....

I bought a Pinus Contorta from Greer Garden Nursery in Oregon awhile back [ sp. Spaans Dwarf] they have very short needles and do seem to back bud easily - even on old wood. Mine is nursery grown so they comparison may not be fair.

Pinus Contorta..another one of these native NW conifers that we don't see enough of on-line or in bonsai books as well. Thanks for showing this tree on-line....

Tom
 

cbobgo

Mame
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hey rich, good seeing you again this weekend. did you guys finish off the rest of the "heartburn" pizza?

this looks like a fun tree to work on, I'm sure Mike will be a great guide for you. (it was good meeting him too - does he get on the forums at all? You should get him on here.)

I like your flame idea. I would recomend trying to start off with that right at the base by trying to bend one of the trunks behind the other and then back out. I think this will give it some good 3 dimensional aspects, and help minimize the slingshot apperance of having the two trunks comeing out like they are.

How flexible are the trunks down that low?

- bob
 

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Shohin
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Hey guys, thanks for the replies. Let's see here...

First, there is good 3D movement to the right trunk, less so with the left. The left trunk comes foward well over 12" in the picture, but it is hard to tell. I envision both of them moving left-right/back-forth similar to the right trunk.

There will be minimal movement allowed down low. Lots of deadwood and very stiff trunks. I could put on #4 wire and get out my 30" branch bender, but in the end I don't think it is what I want or will attempt.

Come down in height? Yeah, a little, but it is the height that makes this unique. If I wanted one half the height, I would go collect 20 of them!

Backbud? Yes, very well on new wood. I have two that I collected last spring and they back budded on newer wood (i.e. non-barked up wood) very easily. I envision a light and airy feel, but more foliage is needed.

It was great of you (Bob) and Brent to come up and spend a few days. The pizza, the conversation and the trees were great. I look forward to the next visit!
 

JasonG

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This is the first time I have admitted this, but it is really a pretty cool tree..... when we collected it I wasn't so sure.... Infact when Rich found it he was "squeking" and "hooting" I thought he found something really good... then I saw the "flames" and had to poke fun at him since then.....

But in reality it is a unique and pretty good little lodgepole. I think once it gets in the Walker pot and has a chance for Mike and Rich to start working on it then it will be a great tree.... but until then I still get to poke fun at him :)

Jason
 

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Shohin
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Infact when Rich found it he was "squeking" and "hooting" I thought he found something really good...
Dude, I am laughing my arse off right now!:D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D

Seriously. Good of you to get in touch with your feminine side and start enjoying the finer side of bonsai...
 

cbobgo

Mame
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Oh - Felco, thats right. Falco was the guy who did that "Rock me Amadeus" song in the 80s. He was pretty felco, too.

- bob
 
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I don't want to rain on anyone parade, but I'm not getting it. How is a very skinny 60" Lodgepole pine getting anybody excited? I love windswept & Literati but a 60" or even a 50" tall tree might be a bit out of proportion.


JC
 

eron jonson

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This tree is a Lodgepole pine - pinus contorta. It is approximately 175 years old (by estimation counting growth on one of the lower limbs coming off the base - a 'la Herb Gustafson).
i very highly doubt that tree is even over twenty years old. and if it were anywhere near the age you were told by a la herb gustafson, i am deeply saddened you would remove such an old tree in hopes of turning it into a bonsai.

im sure im not the only one that would like to see this tree worth the removal 6 years later.
 

Vance Wood

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i very highly doubt that tree is even over twenty years old. and if it were anywhere near the age you were told by a la herb gustafson, i am deeply saddened you would remove such an old tree in hopes of turning it into a bonsai.

im sure im not the only one that would like to see this tree worth the removal 6 years later.
Why? You may be correct about the age but it's removal from the wild is an issue you seem to take exception with. I am curious if it is only concerning this tree or is it an issue with collecting old trees from the field in general?
 

Dan W.

Omono
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I'm curious what the issue is as well... Many trees used in bonsai come from the wild, and many of them are far older than 175 yrs.

I sure would love to see where this one has come and if Michael ever got the chance to style it?
 

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