Two Air layers at once?

james

Mame
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I am planning to air layer a beech this winter/early spring. I have seen examples of multiple layers performed on trees, particularly japanese maple at the same time, usually nursery stock on several branches simultaneously.

Question to all, can more than one layer be done on the trunk? First, a near ground layer, 2" above root line, and second 24" or more inches up the trunk? The tree is too tall, 36" or more, and I wish to reduce height and get 2 trees. There are numerous branches on the tree, so there is plenty of vegetation between the two layer points, and above the second point (full crown). Can this be done in one season, or better done in steps?

Thanks, James
 

Mike423

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Ive rooted and removed multiple branches and different deciduous trees before but have never done so on the same branch. The worst that could happen is it fails and you either have to let it callous over to try again or the branch will simply die. If there's a branch i wish to use more than one segment of i always just airlayer the top portion one year and then do the bottom half the next. sorry that's probably not too much help.
 

Ang3lfir3

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You should be able to do it if there is enough vegetation, which you already stated there was.... depending on the size and vigor of the tree I can't tell you how long it will take.... but shouldn't take more than 1-2 seasons.

this of course is all dependent on size of the things being layered as they need to form enough roots to support the final plant....
 

Bonsai Nut

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Depends on the tree. I wouldn't try it with a pine, but with something like an elm I think it would be easy.
 

Ang3lfir3

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Depends on the tree. I wouldn't try it with a pine, but with something like an elm I think it would be easy.

in this case its a beech.... so he should be fine... tho in SD it could take 2 seasons...
 

Umeboshi

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I tried this on a crab this past season; the upper layer took but the lower layer just calloused. I think that this was just how it happened to work out this time, not an indication that it will not work in the future.
 

kmdesigns

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I did 5 on a Japanese Maple this past spring and they all worked. I've been told though that you shouldn't do one above another because the top will not get enough water and nutrients. The ones I did were all different branches and the main trunk.
 

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