Two Species and Winter Care

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So there are two species that I'm looking at in my yard: euonymous fortunae and European buckthorn. These things seem to be impossible to kill, and if I do, there is plenty more of both in my yard, so I wouldn't be too worried.

I'm new to bonsai, so my thought is to collect a sample of each for the winter to practice with. Trimming, thickening the trunk, trying to achieve some branching.

Does anyone have any experience with these species? Also is it too late to dig out a bit of each for the winter to work on, at least as a pre-bonsai piece? Thanks!
 

GGB

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Awesome way to start. Jealous that you have two options in your own backyard. I am not hesitant to collect in the fall but have some amount of experience with bonsai. As a beginner you're far better off just waiting until late winter, just before the tree wakes up. If in doubt collect early not late. SOooooo much to learn but if you just listen to advice here you will pick things up quickly. Seems like 95% of beginners can't help themselves but ignore conventional wisdom and slowly learn the hard way. That was definitely me. Also welcome to bonsainut, this website is awesome. Include where you are from and you might wind up making some real life friends outside of this online community. Also folks will be be able to give you more tailored wisdom based on climate
 

GGB

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I assume you're European
 
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Actually no! I lived in Germany for a few years way back when. I'm in the north central US.
 

Shibui

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Winter care is very dependant on where you live. For any meaningful advice you should add a location to your profile. North Central US is a big and diverse place so there will be lots of different options for care and for collection timing and after care.
 

brentwood

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I'm in southern Ohio (6a), have experience with trying to kill both those - very invasive, very tough. If you put them in pots, I'd treat them like normal hardy plant - pot on the ground, mulch up to top of pot, protect from your prevailing winds.
B
 

rockm

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Actually no! I lived in Germany for a few years way back when. I'm in the north central US.
you're going to have to provide more info than that to get decent info. By and large, fall isn't a really great time to collect anything, particularly if you're in an area that gets hard winters. ANY collected material can't be worked on immediately after collecting it. You will kill it (Even if its a vigorous species). Once collected--early spring is the best time to dig things up--it's best to wait a couple of years for the tree to recover.

That can be variable however, depending on how much root mass you get when you dig things up. Seedlings, for instance, can be pulled with mostly all their roots. Older trees have to have substantial root reduction.
 
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