Type of Japanese Maple?

digger714

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Hello to everyone. I just picked up this Green Japanese Maple today, but the seller didnt know what type exactly it is. He got it from someone else that didnt know either. With hundreds of different types of maples, im needing help verifying what type it is. Closest ive come so far is a butterfly variegated Japanese Maple. Thanks for any input. Also, any special treatment for the type?

My thoughts are to put it back into the ground to thicken up a little bit, maybe two or three years depending on development. Should any pruning be done depending on the species, or just plant and let recover from that? Should it be barerooted and planted, or just plant from pot?

The first picture doesnt show the white tips of the leaves. Some tips are more pronounced than others.
 

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digger714

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What about a Acer Palmatum Nagiri Nishiki? I saw some pics of some of them. It looks very similar, except some of the pics i saw had a hint of pinkish red in them.
 

garywood

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Digger, chances are that it is a seedling from a large batch of seedlings and is just one of the variants. If it's a seedling there won't be a name. It may be a look-a-like but it won't be named. Names aren't important for enjoyment.
Wood
 

digger714

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Thanks Wood. I was thinking the type would help to figure out the best way to care for it. I guess it would be the same for any other palmatum?
 
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Dav4

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Variegated Acer Palmatums are more sensitive to direct sunlight and therefore more prone to sunscorch.

Dave
 

rockm

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Variegated forms can also look rather odd as bonsai as the leaves tend to be rather "noisy" in compositions. They are not used very much for that reason.
 

digger714

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I have heard that rockm. I was picking up some regular green japanese maples, and this one was beside them. It looked pretty cool, and wasnt too much, so i thought id give it a try. Im planting in the yard, so if I study up on it and decide not to use as bonsai, it still might make a nice landscape tree. Im going for a couple hours of morning shade where im planting. Thanks for the help.

This time of year, would you just plant straight from the pot, or clean the roots up some and arrange before planting, or would it be better to wait until spring to bareroot, and plant with the roots arranged?
 

Bill S

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Acer Palmatum Canibus Sativa - roll em if you got em.

More than once I have been accused of growing weed, one view looks just like it.
 

sfhellwig

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I don't know how many white variegated JM there are but that could definitely be "Butterfly." It is known to have a pinkish tinge to new growth and the amount of variegation can be dependent on the amount of sun it has received. I can't ID it as butterfly for sure but pic #4 appears to show a graft with the understock swelling faster than the graft, making it not a seedling. Nothing "wrong", just the way they go sometimes. I saw a Lion's head at the store that was double the girth underneath it's graft. So I would say it IS a variegated JM. One thing to watch for is reversion. I have read that if Butterfly starts to grow a branch with all green leaves it must be cut off. Much like a shoot from below the graft it will grow aggressively and possibly overtake the variegated foliage, thus ruining the tree.

If you hadn't planted it already I would just get it into the ground. Now is not the time to upset the roots and optimal spreading of the roots at time of planting is just that, optimal. It will still root in and size up regardless. You can work on your trunk flaring techniques on the next one.:p
 

PaulH

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I can't tell from the photos if it is grafted. If you can see the graft then it is more likely to be a named cultivar and I agree it looka a little like Butterfly. No graft and then Gary is probably right and its a serendipitous seedling.
Paul
 

sfhellwig

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This is just as much a question as it is a statement. I don't see the actual fusing but after several seasons that grows over and you may just see a difference in size due to difference in vigor of stocks used. I can't say for sure but it looks "grafty" to me.
 

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PaulH

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That might be a graft just judging by the bark color. If it is its one of the nicest, smoothest grafts I've seen on a maple.
 

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