Up - Potting timing in California

Scrogdor

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I read somewhere, I can't remember where though, that in autumn roots continue to grow and bolster pretty vigorously and this effect occurs up until December in California. I know most people say no repotting until early spring/late winter, but wouldn't "Up-potting" be beneficial in autumn if this is the case? Simply light teasing of roots, or non existent teasing and placing soil/root ball in a larger pot with more room. Large root mass developed in fall would mean a greater spring flush? Referring generally to deciduous trees, and also specifically to a one gallon Oregon White oak I picked up at a nursery that is already root bound.

Appreciate everyone's point of view for this. I may be way off base and wrong about up-potting in fall, but as I dive deeper into bonsai and horticulture; it seems there are different ways of thinking in the community.
 

sorce

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Can enough be said about all the reasons this works against the goal if we just understand the end goal is a small pot.

We want to thicken trunks....
But they will always have to go in a small pot.

Every root grown outside of this future small pots dimensions is wasted energy and time.

Not just the dimensions, but also the proper use of space inside the dimensions, which almost always means cutting off things already inside those dimensions.

So we are essentially beating our heads against walls by creating more growth to sustain while simultaneously creating a root situation we will have to remove....what sustains the more growth then? That's the catch 22.

Properly Designed Air-Root-Pruning containers is the cure for this scenario.

Getting things into baskets straight away is a USE of time, that creates a root scenario you will never have great risk in dealing with.
A proper utilization of root space that seldom needs reduction that causes risk.

Sorce
 

Deep Sea Diver

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One can repot as long as you can provide proper care and conditions afterwards. (This is species dependent and I’m not an oak expert, but sounds ok.).

Yet what you are describing is what is termed is slip potting vs a repot, minmal disturbance of the roots, matching media, larger pot. These can be done almost all favorable times times. Like maybe not when things are -20F or +100F!

Just finished four on the Redwoods that are growing out. I have to cut one out of the pot. Sure sign that up potting was needed.

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In the meantime you might research the threads here on net pots/air pots/pond baskets if you consider your personal horticultural care of tree in these pots can match your local environmental conditions and the type of tree you have..

cheers
DSD sends
 
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BrianBay9

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Fall repotting here is a low risk activity. Winters are so mild many trees never stop growing. In fact the lack of a good winter break may be more problematic for cold temperate species.
 

Scrogdor

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Can enough be said about all the reasons this works against the goal if we just understand the end goal is a small pot.

We want to thicken trunks....
But they will always have to go in a small pot.

Every root grown outside of this future small pots dimensions is wasted energy and time.

Not just the dimensions, but also the proper use of space inside the dimensions, which almost always means cutting off things already inside those dimensions.

So we are essentially beating our heads against walls by creating more growth to sustain while simultaneously creating a root situation we will have to remove....what sustains the more growth then? That's the catch 22.

Properly Designed Air-Root-Pruning containers is the cure for this scenario.

Getting things into baskets straight away is a USE of time, that creates a root scenario you will never have great risk in dealing with.
A proper utilization of root space that seldom needs reduction that causes risk.

Sorce
Amazon accidentally mailed me 4 air pots for the price of 2. So that was my plan.
 

Scrogdor

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Fall repotting here is a low risk activity. Winters are so mild many trees never stop growing. In fact the lack of a good winter break may be more problematic for cold temperate species.
I lived in los angeles for 8 years before I moved back to the bay area, I forgot what fall was like. Hoping I get some decent color change and leaf drop on my deciduous trees here in oakland.
 

BrianBay9

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I lived in los angeles for 8 years before I moved back to the bay area, I forgot what fall was like. Hoping I get some decent color change and leaf drop on my deciduous trees here in oakland.

Good luck with that. I get minimal fall color. My elms drop leaves, but my J maples sometimes hold on to leaves all winter. They look pretty ratty from August to January then I usually have to cut them off.
 

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