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Hello all! My first post, long time lurker.
I have three mallsai, one Chinese elm and two junipers; my question is: I’d like to uppot them for thickening of trunk and growth and development of the trees.
What type of soil will I need for both types of trees?
I live in Houston, TX
Bonus question: could I do that in the autumn in my region?
 

Apex37

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Hello all! My first post, long time lurker.
I have three mallsai, one Chinese elm and two junipers; my question is: I’d like to uppot them for thickening of trunk and growth and development of the trees.
What type of soil will I need for both types of trees?
I live in Houston, TX
Bonus question: could I do that in the autumn in my region?
Mallsai I assume you're meaning a type of ficus? If so, they can be repotted now. The other two I'd wait till next spring. They say go up one pot size each growing season usually.

As far as soil goes, that's a complex question and will be different based on region, type of tree, etc. I live in Texas as well and usually I use half pine bark and half lava rock for my tropicals and have had good success. You can also add or substitute pumice into that mix if you want as well.
 

sorce

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There's almost always something better to do than just uppotting.

Welcome to Crazy!

Pics!

Sorce
 
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There's almost always something better to do than just uppotting.

Welcome to Crazy!

Pics!

Sorce
These are them under sunset light
 

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Thanks for the response. Mallsai is basically term given to bonsai sold often in malls or commercial, I bought them frome some vendor however they’re not in very good quality so my aim is to improve them.
so I want to put them in one gallon nursery pots and grow them but the soil to add there I’m not sure what to put in the mix.
Mallsai I assume you're meaning a type of ficus? If so, they can be repotted now. The other two I'd wait till next spring. They say go up one pot size each growing season usually.

As far as soil goes, that's a complex question and will be different based on region, type of tree, etc. I live in Texas as well and usually I use half pine bark and half lava rock for my tropicals and have had good success. You can also add or substitute pumice into that mix if you want as well.
 

SWfloirda

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Hello all! My first post, long time lurker.
I have three mallsai, one Chinese elm and two junipers; my question is: I’d like to uppot them for thickening of trunk and growth and development of the trees.
What type of soil will I need for both types of trees?
I live in Houston, TX
Bonus question: could I do that in the autumn in my region?
If your trees are in decent health and you are unsure what to do, the best thing to do is just let them live. Follow along this forum, watch YouTube videos, read a book, join a club if you’re into being around old crotchety types and then you’ll have a good plan for the spring. Repot in the spring.
 

Shibui

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Trees can be up potted at any time of year provided you don't remove too many roots but there can be consequences. Where there is a big difference between old soil and new soil roots are often reluctant to move to the new soil. Water may also not move well between old and new soil so while the new soil looks nicely damp the roots in the old soil may be either too dry or too wet Moving to a much larger pot can also cause adverse reaction.

Given that you probably won't get a lot of growth in a few months as a result of up potting it is probably better to be patient and repot properly in spring. Then you can properly assess the roots and do remedial root pruning. You can replace all old soil if required. The trees will be ready for increased growth immediately.
For now I would just feed and water well in the current pots.

Some growers have a different soil mix for different species and everyone seems to have their own special favorite bonsai soil. It is up to you if you want to make things complicated but my bonsai all seem to do well in the same standard mix and trees the world over seem to do quite well in a range of different soil mixes.
 
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a was
Trees can be up potted at any time of year provided you don't remove too many roots but there can be consequences. Where there is a big difference between old soil and new soil roots are often reluctant to move to the new soil. Water may also not move well between old and new soil so while the new soil looks nicely damp the roots in the old soil may be either too dry or too wet Moving to a much larger pot can also cause adverse reaction.

Given that you probably won't get a lot of growth in a few months as a result of up potting it is probably better to be patient and repot properly in spring. Then you can properly assess the roots and do remedial root pruning. You can replace all old soil if required. The trees will be ready for increased growth immediately.
For now I would just feed and water well in the current pots.

Some growers have a different soil mix for different species and everyone seems to have their own special favorite bonsai soil. It is up to you if you want to make things complicated but my bonsai all seem to do well in the same standard mix and trees the world over seem to do quite well in a range of different soil mixes.
much appreciated on the thoughtful response. I will agree with you that though maybe they will do okay on the uppot this fall it’s better to wait for spring and do it then. Found a great store in town that has a good mix for our summers here and works really well as I have seen the owner’s multiple bonsai and they look magnificent with his own mix.
 

Joe Dupre'

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I really wouldn't up-pot until the pots they are in now are full of roots. If you can pull the whole root ball out in one piece and it holds together, then it would be wise to up-pot. It's very possible that those trees haven't been in those pots long enough to make a solid root ball. The pots are also a bit on the large size for the size of the trees. Unless the soil is mucky mess, it might be wise to just leave them in there at least until the spring.
 
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I really wouldn't up-pot until the pots they are in now are full of roots. If you can pull the whole root ball out in one piece and it holds together, then it would be wise to up-pot. It's very possible that those trees haven't been in those pots long enough to make a solid root ball. The pots are also a bit on the large size for the size of the trees. Unless the soil is mucky mess, it might be wise to just leave them in there at least until the spring.
Thanks for the response. To be honest, I don't trust the soil they came in with that is also why I want to change it (come spring time).
 

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