US Bonsai in 20 years?

yenling83

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What will be differnt about Bonsai in the US in 20 years? Styles, popularity, resources, learning, and everything else?

If you had to bet a significant amount of money on something being differnt in 20 years, what would that be?
 

Yamadori

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Display stands will be less traditional. Accents will be more creative/unexpected (a la Ted Matson at Kazari this year and Al last year). The popularity of Penjing will grow so there will be more cross over in personal collections and shows. Scrolls will be more Americanized with less Fuji and more Yosemite.
 

jk_lewis

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Everything bonsai will be MUCH more expensive!
 

donkey

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Everything bonsai will be MUCH more expensive!
MORE EXPENSIVE !:eek: I can't afford real bonsai equipment as it is if i ever even get slightly good at bonsai i will write a book called Bonsai - doing it on the cheap.:eek:
 

Vance Wood

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I think wide spread collecting of natives, especially those collected commercially, will be a thing of the past. I think those who decide to cultivate field grown material specifically for bonsai will be ahead of the curve.
 

Smoke

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None of the above will happen.....

without education there is no growth.

Collecting will continue and probably be larger than it is today as the real people in bonsai move from urban lives to more rural areas in search of a smaller tax burdon.
 

RyanFrye

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In 20 years all plants will have their images in a holographic database on your new Ipad. You'll need to download the latest bonsai app. though if you want to win the new Kokofu-Ten....which you'll be attending in holographic form of course through your nifty Ipad.
 

Brian Van Fleet

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"In 20 years all plants will have their images in a holographic database on your new Ipad. You'll need to download the latest bonsai app. though if you want to win the new Kokofu-Ten....which you'll be attending in holographic form of course through your nifty Ipad. "

Guess that means 2 things...no more dead trees, and you can keep them "in" your television instead of on your television:cool:

Actually, I agree with Al...I foresee a trend toward working with native trees, and with those field-grown just for bonsai. My guess is that we'll advance double from 2010-2030 than we did from 1990-2010...go back and look at "old" International Bonsai and BCI magazines...we've made quantum leaps in the last 20 years. Material is bigger and better, and we have easier access to images of the great trees being done in Japan and Europe.

Onward...Upward!!!

But I still wonder where my jetpack and hovercraft are...thought those were coming soon too...
 

bonsai barry

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Stylistically, I can see the US developing junipers with a more natural look in the needles. Rather than thick pads or clouds, needles will be carefully plucked to more closely resemble the sparse foilage found on these trees at higher altitudes. This style is seen practiced by bonsai artist in Northern CA.
 

DaveV

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I tend to agree with Smoke. Without education there is no growth. Similarly, nothing with great value will come without dedication, patience, trial and error, and hard work. I see people in general (none of you B-Nuts) wanting the quick and easy way out. My prediction is that the number of committed bonsia growers will roughly stay the same but the quality of bonsia material will decrease. This means the value of good bonsai material will go up.
 

J W

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My first response to Smoke (Al's and DaveV) was no way. But the more I sign up for higher priced classes. The less people I see. The masses are looking for a $20 to $50 Dollar tree and then read a $15 dollar book and become a master. Education from Kathy, Jim Gremmel (obviously you know where I"m from) and the knowledge in our local clubs has no dollar amount. But I also notice at 37 I'm an extremely young person in the group. I look at tree's sold for $20 to $5,000 that the masses would think is way to much to spend. But they settle for there one year old tree for $40 every time and then get upset when no one tells them they did a good thing. So they drop that site and sign up for 5 more, asking how to air layer a whip because they see two tree's...

I do admit that we have the talent and the material that could make a statement for us and we do have influence, but sadly the ones that promote the talk the most are the ones that have not acquired the material or the knowledge.

I respect Harry and his tree's. He has knowledge and a good eye for material and a better understanding of how to have people help him with make the best of it.

I have witnessed amazing local tree's collected in private collection's that I have never seen there equal on line from American's. We have alot of older generation's that are working on there collection and not placing it on line. At this time I'm in a club that only considers having a show... Nothing else. They only bring a couple of tree's. But when you see there personal collection it rivals most competitions seen on the web pages.

I think these tree's will be released in 20 to 30 years and alot of us younger guys will be stunned!!!!

JW
 

Smoke

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My first response to Smoke (Al's and DaveV) was no way. But the more I sign up for higher priced classes. The less people I see. The masses are looking for a $20 to $50 Dollar tree and then read a $15 dollar book and become a master. Education from Kathy, Jim Gremmel (obviously you know where I"m from) and the knowledge in our local clubs has no dollar amount. But I also notice at 37 I'm an extremely young person in the group. I look at tree's sold for $20 to $5,000 that the masses would think is way to much to spend. But they settle for there one year old tree for $40 every time and then get upset when no one tells them they did a good thing. So they drop that site and sign up for 5 more, asking how to air layer a whip because they see two tree's...

I do admit that we have the talent and the material that could make a statement for us and we do have influence, but sadly the ones that promote the talk the most are the ones that have not acquired the material or the knowledge.

I respect Harry and his tree's. He has knowledge and a good eye for material and a better understanding of how to have people help him with make the best of it.

I have witnessed amazing local tree's collected in private collection's that I have never seen there equal on line from American's. We have alot of older generation's that are working on there collection and not placing it on line. At this time I'm in a club that only considers having a show... Nothing else. They only bring a couple of tree's. But when you see there personal collection it rivals most competitions seen on the web pages.

I think these tree's will be released in 20 to 30 years and alot of us younger guys will be stunned!!!!

JW
Hi JW, I, being in the central valley CA am really blessed to be between the two big mecca's of bonsai, You being from the true mecca of bonsai with very talented people. Even in California there is a seemingly shortage of qualified teachers. This makes it double hard to get the "better" word out.

Within less than a 45 minute drive of three quality clubs with a combined attendence of over 90 people, I counted only 3 people from those three clubs that came to the display seminar on Sunday at the Toko Kazari. This by Kathy Shaner for 15.00 bucks. Even when high quality education comes no one attends. How can bonsai progress when TV seems the best option for a Sunday afternoon.


To each their own.......
 

nip

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I think there will be much more quality material available in the future. (Considering all the "I just ordered 500 seeds" posts I've seen.)
Technology advancements will help with the lack of education. Just think of bonsai 20 years ago... people in areas with no bonsai club were on an island... now they have the world at their finger tips with the Internet.
One problem that has me worried is the lack of young people in bonsai. At every event I attend I am always the youngest person and I'm in my mid 20s! The average age I see is like 50+. Nothing wrong with that age group, but its alarming considering the future of bonsai depends on the younger generation to take up the torches.
I guess that comes with the territory though. How many teenagers want to garden or do similar pastimes? Very few. Older generations grew up outdoors... gardening, fishing, camping... so when they retire they are attracted to bonsai. Probably also has to do with patient and responsibility. Anyways, I think the growth of bonsai will not be very strong in the future because of the lack of enthusiasm by younger generations. Since Ive joined a bonsai club, membership has steadily dwindled. In Japan, it is part of their tradition so it remains a strong part of their culture. In the US, it is seen as just another way to spend time and money.
Like Al mentioned; even when opportunities to learn are available, people dont participate or attend. It all comes down to passion. You are either passionate about bonsai or you're not. People can own and practice bonsai and still not be passionate about it. Americans are passionate about football and TV, not bonsai :D Ive offered to give trees to friends in an attempt to get them interested, no takers.
I think the trees and talent will continue to improve in select areas. (ie West Coast) However, the overall "scene" of bonsai will not change much. I hope I'm wrong!

We will also all be using more tropical trees because of global warming ;)
 

donkey

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Maybe new styles will develop to match tree's in the modern world like trafficswept we have lots of these on the motorway between glasgow and edinburgh where the central reservation has been planted with trees and all the branches on one side flow in one direction and all the branches on the other side in the other direction(some of the larger ones actually look quite nice). Or maybe trees designed to look like the fake tree's used for mobile phone antenna ?????:p
 

rockm

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I'd bet there will be tighter import restrictions in Europe similar to what's in place here. Europe could experience some heavy losses to imported pests because of its less stringent import laws.

I was quite amazed to see an article in Bonsai Today (back when it was Bonsai Europe or whatever) written by a German or Dutch authoer (can't remember exactly) that had a photographic account of the emergence of a Longhorn Beetle from his newly imported Chinese elm. The author had no clue as to what the insect was and thought it rather charming...:eek: I can't remember if he let it go or not, but since Chinese elm bonsai imports are a proven vector for this insect, I can't imagine that was the only one...

That emergence would have caused the destruction of thousands of trees in the surrounding area here in the US in an attempt to eradicate the thing. Loinghorn beetles are quite capable of killing very old and large trees of many species. I can only imagine what's going to happen on the continent when they start losing more forest...
 

Bill S

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There Here now.

" was quite amazed to see an article in Bonsai Today (back when it was Bonsai Europe or whatever) written by a German or Dutch authoer (can't remember exactly) that had a photographic account of the emergence of a Longhorn Beetle from his newly imported Chinese elm. The author had no clue as to what the insect was and thought it rather charming... I can't remember if he let it go or not, but since Chinese elm bonsai imports are a proven vector for this insect, I can't imagine that was the only one...

That emergence would have caused the destruction of thousands of trees in the surrounding area here in the US in an attempt to eradicate the thing. Loinghorn beetles are quite capable of killing very old and large trees of many species. I can only imagine what's going to happen on the continent when they start losing more forest..."

There heeeeere, about a half hour drive away from me, in the central part of Massachusetts. This problem has already cost millions of dollars, and the removal of one hell of a lot of trees. With the acid rain/pollution problem I have read about in the European forrests this addition would be disasterous.
 

greerhw

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Someone else will own my trees, anyone want in my will, or should I burn them all and take them with me, whoever said you can't it with you, wasn't talking about bonsai trees or dogs, they're going with me if I outlive them.


keep it green,
Harry
 

Smoke

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" was quite amazed to see an article in Bonsai Today (back when it was Bonsai Europe or whatever) written by a German or Dutch authoer (can't remember exactly) that had a photographic account of the emergence of a Longhorn Beetle from his newly imported Chinese elm. The author had no clue as to what the insect was and thought it rather charming... I can't remember if he let it go or not, but since Chinese elm bonsai imports are a proven vector for this insect, I can't imagine that was the only one...

That emergence would have caused the destruction of thousands of trees in the surrounding area here in the US in an attempt to eradicate the thing. Loinghorn beetles are quite capable of killing very old and large trees of many species. I can only imagine what's going to happen on the continent when they start losing more forest..."

There heeeeere, about a half hour drive away from me, in the central part of Massachusetts. This problem has already cost millions of dollars, and the removal of one hell of a lot of trees. With the acid rain/pollution problem I have read about in the European forrests this addition would be disasterous.

I wonder how much New England Bonsai's agressive import policy in the past had to do with that?
 
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