variations in collected trees based on geography

jferrier

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I came across an interesting thread about bald cypress where trees of the same species from different areas of the country were being discussed as having more or less desirable characteristics than the other. It stands to reason to me that a species located in a different geographical area might develop different traits in order to better survive the region it is in. We see this evidenced all the time on a more noticeable scale by selective breeding in nurseries for plants w/ more desirable traits.

This has me wondering how other trees people have collected in the US differ from the same species collected in different areas of the country? Please share if anyone has any insight. Thanks.
 

rockm

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I know that the willow oak (quercus phellos) here in Va. are very different from the same species in Texas. The tree is almost evergreen in Texas and it's leaves have sometimes have small lobes there. It almost looks like a live oak, except that it retains its tall upright silhouette. I'd wager it interbreeds with live oak, as mine bonsai specimen of Texas live oak apparently has taken to being pollinated here in Va. by unrelated oak species, either that or it is self-pollinating.

Speaking of live oaks, the live oak (quercus viriginiana) in the interior of Texas is very different from the main species that grows only a few hundred miles away along the Gulf Coast in La. Ala. Miss. and Fla.. The Texas live oak (quercus virginiana "fusiformis') is variously considered a separate subspecies of Quercus viginiana , or by some as a seperate species --escarpment live oak. It tends toward more upright growth than the sprawling giants by the sea. It's also more winter hardy and more drought tolerant--which helps in Texas.
 

Smoke

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The California juniper prized for its deadwood is different all over the state. In fact it is different within walking areas in the collection sites. The Cal. juniper has hybridized with Utah juniper as well as junipers from Arizona and Nevada.

I have a Cal juniper that exhibits all the traits of a sierra juniper, yet I know it was collected in Mojave, hundreds of miles away and not nearly at the correct altitude. I collected it!

Things that are different are foliage, foliage color, shaggyness of bark, twist and growing habit, growth rate and bark color. Also sex of the species seems to be sporadic while the difference in sex can have many different properties also. I have not seen such a distinct difference in foliage as sex on a Cal. juniper.
 

sparky

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Hey guys. Some trees do act differently in different climates. I have a privet pre-bonsai. In my area(Maine) this tree acts as a deciduous tree would..it loses all it's leaves in winter. If it were to be grown in Florida it would act like a box wood.It would keep it's leaves year 'round. I'm assuming the leaves would be much bigger as well. it wouldn't look like the same tree.
 

greerhw

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The California juniper prized for its deadwood is different all over the state. In fact it is different within walking areas in the collection sites. The Cal. juniper has hybridized with Utah juniper as well as junipers from Arizona and Nevada.

I have a Cal juniper that exhibits all the traits of a sierra juniper, yet I know it was collected in Mojave, hundreds of miles away and not nearly at the correct altitude. I collected it!

Things that are different are foliage, foliage color, shaggyness of bark, twist and growing habit, growth rate and bark color. Also sex of the species seems to be sporadic while the difference in sex can have many different properties also. I have not seen such a distinct difference in foliage as sex on a Cal. juniper.

I had to seperate my Califoricating junipers from my shimpku's, they kept humping their pots, what's a person to do.

Harry
 

Smoke

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I had to seperate my Califoricating junipers from my shimpku's, they kept humping their pots, what's a person to do.

Harry

Put a picture of Pelosi on the shimp pots. That should solve your problem. I know it would keep me from "sniffing" around.
 

jk_lewis

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I have a privet pre-bonsai. In my area(Maine) this tree acts as a deciduous tree would..it loses all it's leaves in winter. If it were to be grown in Florida it would act like a box wood.

Correction: It would die.

Plants, even of the same species, adapt genetically to the climate they are "born" in.

Take the most widespread maple in the eastern USA -- Acer rubrum, the American swamp maple. They grow natively from Mexico to Canada. They look the same (or pretty much so) everywhere. But if you dug one from Michigan and moved it to Florida and planted it, the tree would die after the first couple of years. There would be too little dormancy and too much summer heat. Moving south, it might take as long as a year or two.

However, moving a native from Florida to Michigan, would be fatal as soon as deep winter arrives.
 

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