Visit to a Japanese bonsai nursery

Bonsai Nut

Nuttier than your average Nut
Messages
8,339
Reaction score
14,093
Location
OC, CA
USDA Zone
10A
Thought people might enjoy some of these photos of Shokean bonsai nursery in Osaka, Japan.

A bunch of quinces, ready to go!




Trident maples. Note the nebari and the shallow pots.


Five-needle pines. One of my favorites.
 

Graydon

Chumono
Messages
717
Reaction score
7
Nice! Did you go and take the photos? I would love to make a trip like that. Very impressive stock.

I noticed all of the stock were in either clay pots or finished pots. No plastic anywhere to be seen.
 

Bonsai Nut

Nuttier than your average Nut
Messages
8,339
Reaction score
14,093
Location
OC, CA
USDA Zone
10A
I find these nurseries discouraging. It certainly makes the "art" of bonsai look like mass produced commodity.
Barry;

I don't feel that way. Put differently, today I was in a CostCo and they had a special vendor that was selling bromeliads and 'bonsai'. You know of course the 'bonsai' they were selling - chopped Juniper procumbens with glued gravel for soil and a little mud man. Now THOSE are mass-produced bonsai :)

Every bonsai nursery has to mass-produce trees to stay in business. However they really need to mass-produce bonsai enthusiasts to be successful long term. That means dealing with a lot of beginners and teaching a lot of classes. The 'mass-produced' bonsai in these photos are really for 2nd level students - students that can keep a tree alive, understand general design and style guidelines, and who aren't looking for a major challenge. They just want to buy a tree and enjoy it, or they want to cut 5-10 years off the initial stages of developing bonsai because they don't find pleasure in it.

- Greg
 

bonsai barry

Omono
Messages
1,374
Reaction score
35
Location
Cental Coast of California
USDA Zone
9
Barry;

Every bonsai nursery has to mass-produce trees to stay in business. However they really need to mass-produce bonsai enthusiasts to be successful long term. That means dealing with a lot of beginners and teaching a lot of classes. The 'mass-produced' bonsai in these photos are really for 2nd level students - students that can keep a tree alive, understand general design and style guidelines, and who aren't looking for a major challenge. They just want to buy a tree and enjoy it, or they want to cut 5-10 years off the initial stages of developing bonsai because they don't find pleasure in it.

- Greg
I agree in my mind with what you say, but in my heart...
These are fine specimen (of course any one of those trees is much better than any that I have), but they lack originality and they are far enough along, it seems it will be difficult for the bonsai artist to do much to alter their foundational shape.

On a more selfish level, it makes me wonder what's the point of struggling to create a nice tree when so many are available.

What is amazing is that there is a market for that many nice trees.
 
Last edited:

Similar threads


Top Bottom