Watering Cans

Gr8tfuldad

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Can anyone recommend a nice watering can that they have used and liked? I’m trying to get a watering can for my birthday instead of socks 🤣
 

rockm

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Can anyone recommend a nice watering can that they have used and liked? I’m trying to get a watering can for my birthday instead of socks 🤣
If you want to go "high-end," Haws watering cans are pretty much the equivalent of those copper Japanese watering cans--only more durable. They have fine rose ends that make the same heavy, but gentle shower on soil that doesn't wash it off...Yeah, they're REALLY expensive, but you only buy them once.



 

Lutonian

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rockm

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FWIW, I own a couple of the Japanese copper cans. I've found they're not really practical for everyday use with more than a few trees. They can be a bit delicate, particularly the welds...have had some welds break on handles. They're nice "conversation pieces"

I use a galvanized English watering can that I've had for 20 years. Indestructible.
 

Lutonian

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FWIW, I own a couple of the Japanese copper cans. I've found they're not really practical for everyday use with more than a few trees. They can be a bit delicate, particularly the welds...have had some welds break on handles. They're nice "conversation pieces"

I use a galvanized English watering can that I've had for 20 years. Indestructible.
I think i depends on the manufacturer and QC on how sturdy the japanese cans are. my copper cans are quite new, but my friend has one used day in day out and left under his bench for the last 20ish years (also negishi) and it's still in working condition. (negishi will fix their cans that that are damaged for free if it is a manufacturing defect)

The Haws cans are stronger than the japanese copper cans they will take more abuse and are a lot cheaper but they can be harder to maneuver under tree branches etc, if you have a very large collection i would recommend a watering lance if your time is at a premium.
 

Hartinez

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I’ve been using my Dramm watering can for three years, with no signs of disrepair. It has only been stored outside. 5 stars, highly recommend.
 

rockm

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I....er....ukk...umm...use a....well...a hose.😔
So do I --with a fine rose headed watering attachment. I use watering cans to mix and apply fertilizers. If you've got more than ten trees, watering with a can is a pain in the ass. However, it's nice to have a watering can for some specialized watering duties. Cans with long necks are pretty good at this. As for the "repair for free" option for Japanese cans (i own a Negishi), I assume those repairs would have to be done in Japan...Can't really get my head around how that would be cost-effective...
 
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Lutonian

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So do I --with a fine rose headed watering attachment. I use watering cans to mix and apply fertilizers. If you've got more than ten trees, watering with a can is a pain in the ass. However, it's nice to have a watering can for some specialized watering duties. Cans with long necks are pretty good at this. As for the "repair for free" option for Japanese cans (i own a Negishi), I assume those repairs would have to be done in Japan...Can't really get my head around how that would be cost-effective...
i water most of my collection with a watering can & rain water mostly because my water is hard enough to chew.

It takes about half and hour/forty five minutes (with a can) each watering. I do use a hose watering lance and pump from the rain barrel/water butt sometime when i'm short on time eg watering my trees on my lunch break during hot summer weather but i mostly use the can. one of the good thing about using a can is that can will force you to spend a little time with each tree a couple of times a day making me notice small things better than just hosing and moving on ( I know this is not for everyone).

At the end of the day you can water bonsai with anything that holds water but i would recommend the Haws can as good all-rounder that will last.


Regarding repairing the Japanese can i suppose you will have to pay for postage and packaging, due to the price of a new japanese can this will be cheaper than replacing the for new ( i didn't purchase my japanese cans for myself they were a present from my missus before this i was using the lance and the Haws can).
 

Mike Corazzi

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So do I --with a fine rose headed watering attachment. I use watering cans to mix and apply fertilizers. If you've got more than ten trees, watering with a can is a pain in the ass. However, it's nice to have a watering can for some specialized watering duties. Cans with long necks are pretty good at this. As for the "repair for free" option for Japanese cans (i own a Negishi), I assume those repairs would have to be done in Japan...Can't really get my head around how that would be cost-effective...

I use one of those adjustable sprinkler wands. Reaches everywhere. Can set any spray or stream pattern.
I also have a cheap ass plastic pitcher like thing for dipping fishwater when I want to water one or two trees lightly. :)
 
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