Weak willow help

jwell

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About 2 weeks ago I transplanted into soil 3 australian willows that rooted very well in a bucket of water. I wanted to transplant sooner but I was waiting on some supplies.
The foliage appears to be struggling and I am brand new to bonsai/plants so I’m not sure of the signs it’s giving me. Photo 1 large size pot, Photo 2 is medium pot, Photo 3 is small pot, all have drainage holes. The soil is foxfarms ocean forest. Any suggestions are appreciated as I’m not sure if they are overwatered, underwatered, transplant shock, not enough light for indoor, fertilizer burn, etc. It seems the new growth is slower and has brown tips. The leaves are shrinking but not turning yellow or brown in Photo 1 and Photo 2. In Photo 3 the leaves are falling off lowest branches and dying on the top branch. I’ve heard willows need a lot of water, but these are potted so I don’t want to waterlog the roots. Again, any suggestions are greatly appreciated, thanks.97258D30-8718-4CF9-B217-19D956C6A70B.jpeg03864B2E-42A0-4170-A58D-6F6C4A723F80.jpeg423ABB07-5FF4-4E91-84A0-400532DC70A2.jpeg
 

Tums

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Roots that grow in water are different than roots that grow in soil. Looks like your plants are wilting because the roots were damaged in the transfer from water to soil. Is it humid enough where you have the plants?
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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It looks like they're pushing energy into building but the structures they build cannot support themselves.
Down the line that's a net loss game until they succumb. Best to get them outdoors and into the shade if temperatures allow it.
 

19Mateo83

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About 2 weeks ago I transplanted into soil 3 australian willows that rooted very well in a bucket of water. I wanted to transplant sooner but I was waiting on some supplies.
The foliage appears to be struggling and I am brand new to bonsai/plants so I’m not sure of the signs it’s giving me. Photo 1 large size pot, Photo 2 is medium pot, Photo 3 is small pot, all have drainage holes. The soil is foxfarms ocean forest. Any suggestions are appreciated as I’m not sure if they are overwatered, underwatered, transplant shock, not enough light for indoor, fertilizer burn, etc. It seems the new growth is slower and has brown tips. The leaves are shrinking but not turning yellow or brown in Photo 1 and Photo 2. In Photo 3 the leaves are falling off lowest branches and dying on the top branch. I’ve heard willows need a lot of water, but these are potted so I don’t want to waterlog the roots. Again, any suggestions are greatly appreciated, thanks.View attachment 427352View attachment 427353View attachment 427354
I have has great success with willow cuttings that have rooted in water by keeping the pots waterlogged and gradually watering them less to get the new roots acclimated to being in soil. Try keeping the pots wet. I have even kept the bases of the pots sitting in a dish of water and letting them drink all they want.
 

jwell

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Roots that grow in water are different than roots that grow in soil. Looks like your plants are wilting because the roots were damaged in the transfer from water to soil. Is it humid enough where you have the plants?
Possible roots were damaged as it was my first time transfering any plant. Hygrometer reads around 47%. There is a radiator under the window near the plants that could be a factor as well I suppose. Thanks
 

jwell

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I have has great success with willow cuttings that have rooted in water by keeping the pots waterlogged and gradually watering them less to get the new roots acclimated to being in soil. Try keeping the pots wet. I have even kept the bases of the pots sitting in a dish of water and letting them drink all they want.
Was worried about root rot however they were rooted in water I guess. My cheap moisture meter reads 10/10 near the bottom of the pots and around 5/10 near the tops. Might have to try this on one or all of them. As long as it’s draining I can’t really overwater them hopefully but overwatering and underwatering seem to have similar signs.
 

19Mateo83

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Was worried about root rot however they were rooted in water I guess. My cheap moisture meter reads 10/10 near the bottom of the pots and around 5/10 near the tops. Might have to try this on one or all of them. As long as it’s draining I can’t really overwater them hopefully but overwatering and underwatering seem to have similar signs.
Willow love water, I don’t think you can over water a willow
 

19Mateo83

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Very cool. So it seems like overwatering probably isn’t my issue
I rooted some big black willow cuttings last year in water. I didn’t put them in the water pan after Potting them like I did my weeping and corkscrews willows and the leaves did the same thing yours are doing. They eventually got over it and are coming out at the base of their trunks this year.
 

rockm

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Australian willow is NOT really a willow. Northern hemisphere willows are Salix species. Weeping willow is Salix babylonica. Australian willows are Geijera parviflora. They evolved in a much drier climate and prefer well-drained, drier, but sunny moist sites .

This may have something to do with your tree's behavior. Too much water not enough light from the looks of the foliage. Your soil looks too fine. REgular bonsai soil might be a better choice.



 

Arnold

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Thats why I always try to use scientific names, common names could be misleading. Specially in Australia, the settlers named a lot of species after european trees that have nothing to do with them xD
 

rockm

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Also worth noting the species is hardy zones 9-11--it's a tropical species. Overwintering in Wisconsin should be indoors...deep frost and freezing will probably kill it.

Whenever I see "Australian" in a name, I assume it is a tropical and prefers a drier environment...FWIW, it's in the rutaceae family=citrus family...
 

Mikecheck123

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Australian willow is NOT really a willow. Northern hemisphere willows are Salix species. Weeping willow is Salix babylonica. Australian willows are Geijera parviflora. They evolved in a much drier climate and prefer well-drained, drier, but sunny moist sites .

This may have something to do with your tree's behavior. Too much water not enough light from the looks of the foliage. Your soil looks too fine. REgular bonsai soil might be a better choice.



OP's tree is an Austree hybrid willow, which I think is s. Alba x matsudana.

It is confusingly also marketed by bonsai scammers as an "Australian willow," which as you pointed out can also refer to Geijeira, which is not a willow (but is rather in the citrus family).

Willow cuttings are one of the biggest scams online. They often sell three varieties together: weeping, "dragon" (which is just a curly willow), and "Australian" (which is the Austree hybrid).
 

Mikecheck123

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Willow love water, I don’t think you can over water a willow
Although willows have remarkable water tolerance, I find that they are happiest in normal substrate just like other trees. Of course they suck up water faster, so you have to account for that.
 

rockm

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OP's tree is an Austree hybrid willow, which I think is s. Alba x matsudana.

It is confusingly also marketed by bonsai scammers as an "Australian willow," which as you pointed out can also refer to Geijeira, which is not a willow (but is rather in the citrus family).

Willow cuttings are one of the biggest scams online. They often sell three varieties together: weeping, "dragon" (which is just a curly willow), and "Australian" (which is the Austree hybrid).
Thanks for this.

I retract my advice.

What you have IS NOT AN AUTRALIAN WILLOW. It is a Frankenstein tree made from two North American Salix species--Hankow willow, Salix matsudana and white willow, Salix alba--from what I've seen online and what mikecheck post. It's name comes from the back and forth of exporting it from the U.S./Canada, etc. to the southern Hemisphere and back again:

"Australians call this tree "New Zealand hybrid willow" while North Americans know it as the "Australian hybrid willow" or by the trademark name Austree."

Not all that familiar with the tree, obviously. It is a fast-growing variety used as screening and windbreaks--like Leyland Cypress. I have no experience with it, BUT from what I've read, I would avoid it for bonsai. It looks to drop branching like most willows...
 

rockm

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Actually the species used to hybridize are Asian and European/central Asian not North American, but Northern Hemisphere.
 
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