Well developed Canadian Bonsai

Bad_Bonsai

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Can anyone share some examples of well developed Canadian Species of Bonsai?

I've been at it for about 3 years, with some success (and a lot of failures) I've sharpened my skills on mainly garden tree materials from local nurseries but I'm approaching my third spring season and I've still got 'the bug' so I'm curious to know the extent of work that's been done in Canada with hardy native Canadian species.
 

River's Edge

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Can anyone share some examples of well developed Canadian Species of Bonsai?

I've been at it for about 3 years, with some success (and a lot of failures) I've sharpened my skills on mainly garden tree materials from local nurseries but I'm approaching my third spring season and I've still got 'the bug' so I'm curious to know the extent of work that's been done in Canada with hardy native Canadian species.
It is a good idea to put your location in your profile if you have the time.
Not sure if you consider these well developed or not! Shore Pine, Mountain Hemlock, Yellow Cedar, and Sub Alpine Fir ( under development)
 

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HorseloverFat

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Seeing as species’ “ranges” are somewhat “rolling” through the North American continent.. I believe you will find many “intersecting” points between Canadian and (northern) North American species..

The above examples excellent, also.

🤓
 

River's Edge

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Seeing as species’ “ranges” are somewhat “rolling” through the North American continent.. I believe you will find many “intersecting” points between Canadian and (northern) North American species..

The above examples excellent, also.

🤓
Exactly, probably more appropriate to refer to North American species that come from your locality.
 

Bad_Bonsai

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It is a good idea to put your location in your profile if you have the time.
Not sure if you consider these well developed or not! Shore Pine, Mountain Hemlock, Yellow Cedar, and Sub Alpine Fir ( under development)
Those are fantastic trees! How many years in development?

And thanks for the tip, ill definitely add my location.
 

River's Edge

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Those are fantastic trees! How many years in development?

And thanks for the tip, ill definitely add my location.
Your location and climate zone is helpful for others to respond and provide direction.
The trees pictured average 5-6 years for the first three, the last one ( sub alpine fir ) is three years into development. There are also many better examples of trees collected in Canada that have been developed to high levels by Bonsai enthusiasts outside of Canada. I have seen them displayed in shows regularly throughout Washington, Oregon and California . Professional Artists such as Boon, Michael and Ryan to name a few have styled some amazing trees that originated in Canada. There is a lengthy history of nicely developed species in Eastern Canada which can be viewed online with bonsai shows and artists in Ontario and Quebec. For one example check out the website of the Toronto Bonsai Society if you are interested.
 

Tycoss

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I think a lot of conifer species have wonderful potential. Mine are not well developed yet, but the Englemann and white spruce, lodgepole pines and tamarack larch I have collected have done very well so far. They are under the snow at the moment but you can see some in my past posts.
I think a lot of Canadians are still told outdoor bonsai is not practical in our climate. I remember being told "if you are not a rich old man in a temperate climate, it's really not worth trying." I'm still a beginner, but I've sure had fun so far.
 

River's Edge

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I think a lot of conifer species have wonderful potential. Mine are not well developed yet, but the Englemann and white spruce, lodgepole pines and tamarack larch I have collected have done very well so far. They are under the snow at the moment but you can see some in my past posts.
I think a lot of Canadians are still told outdoor bonsai is not practical in our climate. I remember being told "if you are not a rich old man in a temperate climate, it's really not worth trying." I'm still a beginner, but I've sure had fun so far.
The Englemann deserves extra attention, very similar to Ezo spruce. If you wish to develop from cuttings, the engleman responds well and grows quickly! Natural small needles and beautiful colour with a high propensity for back budding. I would be tempted to try the birch in your neck of the woods, love the park and leaf structure. if you have some winter protection available you should try JBP, JRP and Shore Pine.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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Both the Toronto and the Montreal Botanic Gardens have excellent bonsai collections with a number of masterpieces by Canadian artists, or from one crazy USA artist, named Nick Lenz. You must get to both collections. One to look for is "Penelope" by Nick Lenz. It is creative, whimsical, and a very serious piece of art, all in one. I think "Penelope" is in Montreal. She was on tour to the USA National Bonsai Collection in 2019, then she went back home to Canada. You have some great bonsai "up north" in Eastern Canada.

Larix laricina Penelope 2014 by Nick Lenz (2019_10_20 19_42_16 UTC).jpg

IMG_20191114_131317.jpg
 

Yugen

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Here is a few I could find on my phone, from left to right
Shore pine, mountain hemlock arbutus, shore pine, mountain hemlock, shore pine, sub alpine fir
All yamadori
 

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ghues

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Welcome to the addiction.
Have you looked into the Ottawa Bonsai Society? Ottawabonsai.org They would be a great resource as you move forward on your Bonsai journey.
Thus far many western species have been shown but they wouldn’t be ideal for your location. Perhaps White and black spruce, eastern larch, eastern white cedar which are native to your area.
 

Bad_Bonsai

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This blog has fantastic posts on species that are commonly found throughout Ontario (and Eastern Canada more generally):

https://bonsaivl.wordpress.com/
Thats a great blog and ontario specific! Thanks for the link.

The very first bonsai i had ever styled myself, (and in the process immediately killed) was a eastern cedar, I haven't touched a cedar since but this an article in there has me wanting to try it again.
 
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I think "Penelope" is in Montreal

it’s in Ontario now, in very good hands 🙂

@Bad_Bonsai the montreal botanical gardens recently release a book (link below). The garden has at least 3 pavillions with bonsai: chinese, japanese, and a spectacular native collection


If you are not already a member of your closest bonsai society, you should be! List here:

 

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