Westringia

smilezzz

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I remember taking my smaller ones to club a while back, and the general consensus was that although westringia does lend itself to Bonsai cultivation quite well, it's not really a subject used in SA all that much.

Strange really, because it's a fantastic shrub. I like to think it's because it's Australian, and there's some bad blood there between horticultural societies since they tried to steal the "Acacia" name from us Africans... (screw "Senegalia" , they'll always be "Acacia" to me).

Jokes aside, I love these little trees. The flowers are pretty, the bark looks great, and they're water-wise, which is huge plus where I'm from.

Picked these up 2 years ago, and left them in the bags they came in. Weather's warming up a bit so times perfect for some pruning.

They didn't put on much more girth since purchase, but the damned roots ran wild into my flower beds. I have some experience with smaller ones, so felt comfortable doing massive root reduction (though I think I might have overdone it a bit...) to fit in training "pots".

They're in my mini greenhouse now, and will be for the next 3 weeks or so, to recover from the drastic root reduction. After that, I'll plonk them down on my flower bed once again, but will keep a closer eye on the roots, letting minimal escape, just to increase the pace of growing new branches.

I've left all the major branches to attempt some dead wood features on them, after I leave them alone for a couple of growing seasons to select favorable branches. I've also planted them a bit deeper in the baskets to thicken surface roots faster.

Edit: issues with uploading pics... Do I feel like a doofus now...
 
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Shibui

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'Steal' the acacia name!!!! Australia definitely deserves to use that name for the hundreds of species of attractive trees and shrubs rather than waste it on the few thorny giraffe eaten trees of Africa.

The photo links lead to 'not found' so i can't see the plants yet.
There is a limit to file size on B'nut so try compressing the photos a bit to get file size down to around 1Mb before trying to attach.

Westringea responds well to pruning but I have not had much luck with back budding on bare wood so need to keep them pruned to maintain foliage where it is needed. I have not done much root pruning but they are very easy to strike as cuttings so will probably tolerate quite severe root pruning.
Westringea are not large trees or shrubs in any conditions so trunks won't thicken much or thicken fast.
Dead wood is unlikely to last long as the wood is very soft and rots fast.

Look forward to seeing some photos if you can get them up.
 

smilezzz

Yamadori
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'Steal' the acacia name!!!! Australia definitely deserves to use that name for the hundreds of species of attractive trees and shrubs rather than waste it on the few thorny giraffe eaten trees of Africa.

The photo links lead to 'not found' so i can't see the plants yet.
There is a limit to file size on B'nut so try compressing the photos a bit to get file size down to around 1Mb before trying to attach.

Westringea responds well to pruning but I have not had much luck with back budding on bare wood so need to keep them pruned to maintain foliage where it is needed. I have not done much root pruning but they are very easy to strike as cuttings so will probably tolerate quite severe root pruning.
Westringea are not large trees or shrubs in any conditions so trunks won't thicken much or thicken fast.
Dead wood is unlikely to last long as the wood is very soft and rots fast.

Look forward to seeing some photos if you can get them up.
Yes, STOLE I SAY!!!

HMPH, it's that attitude that ensures the Springboks have an upper against the Wallabies (please don't bring cricket into this).

Just going to attempt to post the compressed files... I feel so technologically deficient right now...

1630871232870IMG_20210822_140854.jpg1630871240576IMG_20210822_160507.jpg1630871242998IMG_20210822_160514.jpg1630871294398IMG_20210905_115101.jpg1630871296735IMG_20210905_120142.jpg1630871299074IMG_20210905_120843.jpg1630871301359IMG_20210905_123038.jpg1630871303738IMG_20210905_123046.jpgIt's a pity about the deadwood. I have noticed it's quite soft, so perhaps wishful thinking on my part. I love the gnarly growth habit on older specimens, and it would have complemented it well, but I'll bow down to superior experience here...

I haven't had an issue with them back budding, but I did (and always try to) make sure that there were some buds popping out when I pruned the top, though it's difficult to see on the compressed images... They were quite small...
 

Shibui

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Even Seth Efricans can manage some technology with a little help, provided it is fairly simple. Well done.

Look forward to seeing how these come along.
I agree that the trunk shapes and bark textures are ideal for bonsai. Glad we were able to provide another useful species for you to work with.
 

smilezzz

Yamadori
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Even Seth Efricans can manage some technology with a little help, provided it is fairly simple. Well done.

Look forward to seeing how these come along.
I agree that the trunk shapes and bark textures are ideal for bonsai. Glad we were able to provide another useful species for you to work with.
Yep, eyeing up the coprosma in the corner. I'm sure there's a bedtime lullaby there somewhere.
 

Snorlax99

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This is one of my Westringia. Got it for that gnarly twist in the trunk. The job right now is to chase back the growth on the branches
 
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