What’s On This Collected Doug Fir?

Josh88

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I didn’t notice this in the wilds, but upon potting up this collected Doug Fir I noticed little circular white masses where some needles meet stem. Can anyone ID this?
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wireme

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They will feed on the young needles when the buds open discolouring them very quickly.
They can be blasted off with water but it takes persistence and you need to develop the technique, it’s not easy. Dusting with DE when they are very young and haven’t grown the white fluff yet works ok. Small window of time there just as buds are elongating. Insecticidal soap during this stage also works very well but the soap may strip the protective covering off young emerging needles leaving them more susceptible to a needle rust that’s very common with dougies. I’m not really sure that’s the case but have thought I noticed a co-relation before, maybe it was just weather.
 

Josh88

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They will feed on the young needles when the buds open discolouring them very quickly.
They can be blasted off with water but it takes persistence and you need to develop the technique, it’s not easy. Dusting with DE when they are very young and haven’t grown the white fluff yet works ok. Small window of time there just as buds are elongating. Insecticidal soap during this stage also works very well but the soap may strip the protective covering off young emerging needles leaving them more susceptible to a needle rust that’s very common with dougies. I’m not really sure that’s the case but have thought I noticed a co-relation before, maybe it was just weather.
Thank you!
 

PiñonJ

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When they’re done with your dougie, they’ll move on to your spruces, where the galls will form, to produce the next generation.
 

Josh88

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When they’re done with your dougie, they’ll move on to your spruces, where the galls will form, to produce the next generation.
How far away from other trees should I keep this to avoid cross contamination?
 

Arcto

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Tough to prevent 100%. I’d keep it downwind of your other trees so prevailing winds don’t blow loose ones into new foliage. Perching birds can get them on their feet and transport them. I think Wireme’s suggestions are good. Knock em down while you can and be vigilant.
 

wireme

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I don't know if it's possible in the same yard. Maybe @wireme knows, or @Arcto.
Part of their lifecycle is migratory with wings so...distance may not matter much.
Depends, if this is the only tree around with the critters then, downwind as arctic says, get’em right away before they multiply as per piñon and no more problems. It would be nice to live somewhere they are not everywhere. Here the forest is full of them so they will always be a thing no matter what I do. Maybe someday I’ll break down and try the systematic route... Actuality, I watch the trees in the forest with incredibly heavy infestations and it surprising how well they continue to grow
 

Arcto

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Wireme brings up a point. If you have large natural dougies or spruce in your yard, you don’t want an infestation started in them. It’s much harder to control a bug problem in a 80’ tree. Your trees in your collection could be reinfested every year. I’d shade my newly collected stock under some big spruce in my yard in central OR. I kept finding scale on my collected stuff. Took a while to figure out the big shading spruce were infested with them and passing it on to all my collected material underneath.
 

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