what are the top root cutting shears and should it be in stainless?

Corrado

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I need to replace my old root shears and want to buy a top brand. Also would it be wise to get it in stainless steel?
 

sorce

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I'd buy Kaneshin cuz it's a good middle ground. By middle ground I mean the Best that isn't price jacked for purposes of seeming better.

Stainless is more brittle and harder to resharpen.

In the roots, where you may hit a rock, I wouldn't use stainless.

I wouldn't use stainless unless you always work in your sprinkler and MUST look the ballenest.

Sorce
 

rockm

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FWIW, I don't replace root shears with new root shears. Since the tools used to reduce roots take ALOT of abuse and wear, I prefer to use older shears used on top growth, not the smaller shoot scissors, but larger shears. I just keep them sharp...I buy new top shears then cycle them through.

And I wouldn't go out of my way to get stainless.
 

Corrado

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Hmm, so it seems for shears stay away from stainless because of its difficulty sharpening them when you hit stones. I also remembered a brand called Masakuni. They are a carbon steel. How are those?
 

BobbyLane

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i wouldnt stress about this, often i find myself using secateurs, sharp scissors or even blunt over used ones. large knob cutters on heavy or woody roots. very rarely do i use the bonsai specific root cutters.

these ones, they come in handy though on occasion as theyre also great at tearing slivers out of wood!
 

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Corrado

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those look more specialized for knobs cutting I do some times use my angled branch cutter for a thick root but most of the roots are a fibrous mass that shears cut thru pretty easily and makes quick time of it. I admit, I do like to stay with top brand stuff (keeps to the tradition?) So--Anyone have any thing good or bad to say on Joshua Roth or Masakuni or Kaneshin?
 

rockm

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i wouldnt stress about this, often i find myself using secateurs, sharp scissors or even blunt over used ones. large knob cutters on heavy or woody roots. very rarely do i use the bonsai specific root cutters.

these ones, they come in handy though on occasion as theyre also great at tearing slivers out of wood!
I also have specialized knob cutters and heavy cutters to reduce big dominant roots. I tend not to look at brands. I look at prices and I buy in person. Over the years, you get a feel for a decent tool, regardless of the name on it (and BTW, most tools are made by only two, possibly three manufacturers in Japan, China has a lot, but their tools are mostly crap)
 

Adair M

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Masakuni are the top quality bonsai tools, with a high price. Their steel is great for cutting wood, but it’s rather soft. But easily sharpened. I don’t use them for roots. Masakuni does make stainless steel tools, too, but I find there are other manufacturers who make quality SS tools w/o the extremely high price.

I do have Stainless Steel root shears. Working around soil, they’re often exposed to damp conditions, and being stainless, they resist rusting.

My go to root shears are stainless “bent” shears by Kaneshin. I would buy directly from Kaneshin, from their website, or from Jonas at www.bonsaitonight.com. The bend in the handles allows you to cut the bottoms of rootballs flat without your fingers holding the shears having to scrape across the bottom. They should be about $70 or $80. Avoid eBay.

Stainless is a bit harder than carbon steel to sharpen, on the other hand, it resists dulling, too. I find the Kaneshin root shears hold up very well.

I’ve never used any Joshua Roth tools.
 

arreaux

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I've used Joshua Roth, their Japan produced tools. They do have a Chinese line "Ryuga" that I've never tried. I prefer carbon steel over the softer stainless steel metals. The carbon steel will hold an edge longer than Stainless.
Stainless steel has cool factor, but I have some Joshua Roth I purchased in the 80's and have taken care of then and sharpened on a few rare occasions. They look exactly like they did when I purchased them.
As for trimming roots, I just use some decent plastic handled scissors since they would be encountering soil when trimming roots.
 

penumbra

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mach6

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I don't replace root shears with new root shears. Since the tools used to reduce roots take ALOT of abuse and wear, I prefer to use older shears used on top growth
This is also what Kaneshin themselves recommend to me (attached), when I inquired about getting pruning shears

@Corrado I have been buying directly from Kaneshin for years - always very honest! Write to them, explain what you want to use the tool for, and they will recommend the appropriate tool with the best bang-for-your-buck
 

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Corrado

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Oh boy, well I did it. I ended up buying a very nice Masakuni Shears . Its almost 8 inches long with 3 inch blades in carbon steel. Price at $80. But I like those Fiskars Shears for perhaps the heavy work . I might get those too.
 
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