What bonsai species are semi-common in Japan and not in the USA

Njyamadori

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So I’ve recently been buying Japanese Beautyberry to develop. They aren’t common in the USA but in Japan they seem like a plant that people know in the bonsai world . So I wanted to know if anyone knows a plant that’s used for bonsai in Japan and not the USA and if they think the US should have that plant ?
 

Ohmy222

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Ezo Spruce or Picea Ghelani are very rarely seen in the US and common in parts of Japan. Oriental Bittersweet is one I see in several Shohin books that I have never seen in the US. Star Jasmine or Chiramen are the same. The latter is weird because they are very common in nurseries but not in US bonsai.
 

Njyamadori

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Ezo Spruce or Picea Ghelani are very rarely seen in the US and common in parts of Japan. Oriental Bittersweet is one I see in several Shohin books that I have never seen in the US. Star Jasmine or Chiramen are the same. The latter is weird because they are very common in nurseries but not in US bonsai.
Ezo spruce looks very cool . Also oriental bittersweet. I’m gonna make hardwood cuttings of bittersweet since there is tons around where I live and it’s the oriental species! In the Ultimate Bonsai Handbook it shows an Oriental Bittersweet. He makes a little shohin . But yeah I only see a few examples online !
 

Eric Schrader

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Sekka Hinoki.
Xumi Crabapple.
Whatever the Gardenia they use is...small leaf like an azalea but a nice plant.
The dwarf kumquats are amazing, never see those here. I think Jonas had one for a while.
Needle Juniper....which is odd because we have plenty of juniper varieties.
Ilex Serrata, although we have plenty of Ilex vomitoria.
We have nearly no Chojubai of any quality, although many people are now propagating and growing them finally.
Chinese quince is also not super common here, but I've seen a fair share of them over the years, they just don't seem to stick around for some reason.
Stewartia monodelpha is popular, you see it here, but not a lot.
The dwarf Trachelospermum asiaticum that they use is something I've never seen in the US.

If I had to pick just one that we could see a lot more of I think it would be Xumi Crabapple. Tiny leaves, tiny yellow apples that stay on into winter, reliable white flowers in early spring. What's not to like.

E.
 
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A few that I can think of: Although I'm not American, so I'm just going on what I don't see people post here.

1. Ezo Spruce (2 common varieties in Japan: Red and Black)
2. Sekka Hinoki
3. Kuchinashi (Gardenia jasminoides "Cape Jasmine")
4. Isozanshou - Also sometimes called "Tennouume/Tennoubai" (don't even know how this one would be translated, sort of a pepper plant native to Okinawa. They form little white flowers are grow peppercorns) Photos here
5. Japanese White Pine (some of you have them, but certainly not that many) - There are some cultivars I've definitely not seen on these forums.
6. Nishikimatsu (Cork Bark Black Pine? - Not sure if they're the same thing or not)
7. Toshou (Needle Juniper?)
8. Iwahiba (Selaginella tamariscina?) - Don't even know what these technically are. Not a tree really, but still many bonsai people keep them and display them, although not often in shows. (shrug) - They have hinoki-like foliage but appear to grow with a skeleton like a hard coral does.
9. Yuzu - Saw and amazing example at Seikouen last month. Rare as bonsai.
10. Haze (seems they might be called a wax tree) - Very common in small shohin/mame sized groups.

^#1-5 I personally have one or more of, and have not seem much of on these forums. The others I don't own but are common enough (minus the yuzu).
 

Njyamadori

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Sekka Hinoki.
Xumi Crabapple.
Whatever the Gardenia they use is...small leaf like an azalea but a nice plant.
The dwarf kumquats are amazing, never see those here. I think Jonas had one for a while.
Needle Juniper....which is odd because we have plenty of juniper varieties.
Ilex Serrata, although we have plenty of Ilex vomitoria.
We have nearly no Chojubai of any quality, although many people are now propagating and growing them finally.
Chinese quince is also not super common here, but I've seen a fair share of them over the years, they just don't seem to stick around for some reason.
Stewartia monodelpha is popular, you see it here, but not a lot.
The dwarf Trachelospermum asiaticum that they use is something I've never seen in the US.

If I had to pick just one that we could see a lot more of I think it would be Xumi Crabapple. Tiny leaves, tiny yellow apples that stay on into winter, reliable white flowers in early spring. What's not to like.

E.
When I was just starting off I was trying to find Zumi crabapple 😂 This book I have has what I think is a zumi crabapple and I’m guessing you didn’t mean to write xumi.
 

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Eric Schrader

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When I was just starting off I was trying to find Zumi crabapple 😂 This book I have has what I think is a zumi crabapple and I’m guessing you didn’t mean to write xumi.
Yeah, funny how when you've never seen it in writing before it's hard to know how to spell it! I bought seed from a vendor in the Green Club in 2016 and now have about two dozen trees in development, but the species is not a slam dunk for me in terms of growing. It keeps getting scorched in the sun because I have too many trees to water to pay close attention.
 

Njyamadori

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Hey guys I was wondering about Stachyurus praecox , and Himeringo ! Saw them in my book and I’m interested! Might even buy the Stacgyurus as a nursery stock and try to see if I can style it like in the picture or air layer for fun !
 

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Hey guys I was wondering about Stachyurus praecox , and Himeringo ! Saw them in my book and I’m interested! Might even buy the Stacgyurus as a nursery stock and try to see if I can style it like in the picture or air layer for fun !
Himeringo are very common here, even at home centers. I bought my first about a month ago from a nursery.
Not much to say about it yet. They seem to be very prone to leaf problems/diseases, although this one seems much more healthy than when I got it. The apical shoots grow really quickly. I just had to cut the top apex of this tree down and that appears to have activated some dormant buds lower on the tree.

I also know that they will produce a lot of apples, so must people reduce them to pairs in strong parts of the tree. Often each flower bud will produce something like 8-10 apples. They can be pollinated with other related species (doesn't have to be himeringo). However, I can't for the life of me remember which.
 

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Njyamadori

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Himeringo are very common here, even at home centers. I bought my first about a month ago from a nursery.
Not much to say about it yet. They seem to be very prone to leaf problems/diseases, although this one seems much more healthy than when I got it. The apical shoots grow really quickly. I just had to cut the top apex of this tree down and that appears to have activated some dormant buds lower on the tree.

I also know that they will produce a lot of apples, so must people reduce them to pairs in strong parts of the tree. Often each flower bud will produce something like 8-10 apples. They can be pollinated with other related species (doesn't have to be himeringo). However, I can't for the life of me remember which.
Oh very cool tree ! Couldn’t find that much on Google about it . I will look into some trees on your list !
 

Njyamadori

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A few that I can think of: Although I'm not American, so I'm just going on what I don't see people post here.

1. Ezo Spruce (2 common varieties in Japan: Red and Black)
2. Sekka Hinoki
3. Kuchinashi (Gardenia jasminoides "Cape Jasmine")
4. Isozanshou - Also sometimes called "Tennouume/Tennoubai" (don't even know how this one would be translated, sort of a pepper plant native to Okinawa. They form little white flowers are grow peppercorns) Photos here
5. Japanese White Pine (some of you have them, but certainly not that many) - There are some cultivars I've definitely not seen on these forums.
6. Nishikimatsu (Cork Bark Black Pine? - Not sure if they're the same thing or not)
7. Toshou (Needle Juniper?)
8. Iwahiba (Selaginella tamariscina?) - Don't even know what these technically are. Not a tree really, but still many bonsai people keep them and display them, although not often in shows. (shrug) - They have hinoki-like foliage but appear to grow with a skeleton like a hard coral does.
9. Yuzu - Saw and amazing example at Seikouen last month. Rare as bonsai.
10. Haze (seems they might be called a wax tree) - Very common in small shohin/mame sized groups.

^#1-5 I personally have one or more of, and have not seem much of on these forums. The others I don't own but are common enough (minus the yuzu).
Since your someone actually in Japan , do you know what beautyberry is and have you seen it as a bonsai ?
 
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Since your someone actually in Japan , do you know what beautyberry is and have you seen it as a bonsai ?
I had to figure out what they're called in Japanese and have a look. I started bonsai after moving to Japan, so I actually don't know/forget a lot of the English/Latin names for trees. There are also plenty I'm just not familiar with at all.
From what I can find they are called 紫式部 (Murasaki Shikibu) Purple minister (bad translation) - Oddly enough, this is also the name of the author of the very famous Genji Monogatari "The Tale of Genji"
One of my big bonsai books has a care sheet for it, so I would assume it's reasonably common.
I found some raw material for sale in my usual places, but not so many developed bonsai. Pictures here

They really are quite pretty. Lovely purple berries.
 

JudyB

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Himeringo are very common here, even at home centers. I bought my first about a month ago from a nursery.
Not much to say about it yet. They seem to be very prone to leaf problems/diseases, although this one seems much more healthy than when I got it. The apical shoots grow really quickly. I just had to cut the top apex of this tree down and that appears to have activated some dormant buds lower on the tree.

I also know that they will produce a lot of apples, so must people reduce them to pairs in strong parts of the tree. Often each flower bud will produce something like 8-10 apples. They can be pollinated with other related species (doesn't have to be himeringo). However, I can't for the life of me remember which.
I have a Himeringo, and it is very prone to all sorts of leaf issues. It's pretty vigorous, and it does produce lots of fruits, but for the life of me I can't keep them on the tree till maturity most years. Here is a photo of spring flowering and the fruits that fall. Although I got the fruit to mature that year, the leaves were not good by fall...
I also have several others on these lists, beautyberry, and Chirimen. Both are pretty easy to grow. Chirimen does great in shallow pot and lots of sun. Sekka is getting easier to find, I have several. If anyone wants, I do have two that are in pots, but not yet styled...
IMG_2506.jpgIMG_2915.jpg
 

JudyB

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Since your someone actually in Japan , do you know what beautyberry is and have you seen it as a bonsai ?
Spring and fall shots of mine, I know that some people are starting to propagate these for bonsai here. They are Callicarpa.
IMG_2437.jpgIMG_3008.jpg
 
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I have a Himeringo, and it is very prone to all sorts of leaf issues. It's pretty vigorous, and it does produce lots of fruits, but for the life of me I can't keep them on the tree till maturity most years. Here is a photo of spring flowering and the fruits that fall. Although I got the fruit to mature that year, the leaves were not good by fall...
I also have several others on these lists, beautyberry, and Chirimen. Both are pretty easy to grow. Chirimen does great in shallow pot and lots of sun. Sekka is getting easier to find, I have several. If anyone wants, I do have two that are in pots, but not yet styled...
View attachment 392699View attachment 392700
Thanks for sharing Judy.

I've had a tough time finding an answer for this, but you can likely answer. Do these backbud at all? I find the urge to try to reduce mine in height and I can see little stubs down the trunks where there was once foliage. I can also spot some dormant looking buds in places that appear to be alive.

Basically, how do you prevent it from getting larger and larger every year?
 

JudyB

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Thanks for sharing Judy.

I've had a tough time finding an answer for this, but you can likely answer. Do these backbud at all? I find the urge to try to reduce mine in height and I can see little stubs down the trunks where there was once foliage. I can also spot some dormant looking buds in places that appear to be alive.

Basically, how do you prevent it from getting larger and larger every year?
It is not easy, I have the same problem with mine. I do get backbudding but it's not a sure thing. I think that you just have to do it in small increments so it doesn't die back on you. I've lost a few branches over time.
 

Njyamadori

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Spring and fall shots of mine, I know that some people are starting to propagate these for bonsai here. They are Callicarpa.
View attachment 392701View attachment 392702
Amazing tree and it looks like one of Seirgos from a few years back. Everyone in New Jersey now has them so I jumped on the trend. I want to develop seedlings so I got 2 2-3 year old seedlings , 2 1 year old , and 10 new seedlings that I got from a guy in New Jersey and on these threads . Callicarpa. Japonica
 

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JudyB

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Amazing tree and it looks like one of Seirgos from a few years back. Everyone in New Jersey now has them so I jumped on the trend. I want to develop seedlings so I got 2 2-3 year old seedlings , 2 1 year old , and 10 new seedlings that I got from a guy in New Jersey and on these threads . Callicarpa. Japonica
It is one of his, I traded a beech for it!
 
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