What did I find on trip in tenn

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#1
image.jpeg sorry for the crappy pic but right now it's as close as I can get. Leafs are thin and kind of look like a lace leaf maple. Strange thing is they are white and pink and looks to have a couple green ones also. It's a small tree only about 10" tall and about the size of a pencil.
 
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#2
I can't tell from that pic if it is an Acer or not. It looks a bit like the new growth of A.p. 'Ukigumo'. As the leaves mature that cultivar changes to a mottled green and white. It frequently produces green leaves as well.

Here is what my Ukigumo looks like. The newest growth is still pink tinged but it's mostly green.

Here is what these trees *sometimes* look like in spring:
http://www.paghat.com/images/floatingcloud_may.jpg
 

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#3
I can't tell from that pic if it is an Acer or not. It looks a bit like the new growth of A.p. 'Ukigumo'. As the leaves mature that cultivar changes to a mottled green and white. It frequently produces green leaves as well.

Here is what my Ukigumo looks like. The newest growth is still pink tinged but it's mostly green.

Here is what these trees *sometimes* look like in spring:
http://www.paghat.com/images/floatingcloud_may.jpg
Thanks for the link you might be right. I'll try to get a better picture of it. If it's a ukigumo is it good for bonsai? Also being in tenn should I assume it's not a native tree around here?
 
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Boulder, CO
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#8
You can dig a large rootball around it and it should be fine. Or, you can scoop it up early in spring and have a relatively bigger trunk, and be able to be more aggressive on root pruning. Which alternative you choose will either set you back a year or benefit the long term goal, its up to you. Cool plant, I say leave it, for a couple years, as long as it is accessible later on.
 
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#10
You can dig a large rootball around it and it should be fine. Or, you can scoop it up early in spring and have a relatively bigger trunk, and be able to be more aggressive on root pruning. Which alternative you choose will either set you back a year or benefit the long term goal, its up to you. Cool plant, I say leave it, for a couple years, as long as it is accessible later on.
Wish I could leave it and get it later. I'm at a birthday party for the weekend in tenn and I'm from Ohio. This thing is growing wild on the hillside going down to the lake so it's a now or never on this one. Being so small in hoping will make it easier since the roots won't be as fa out so hopefully I can get most/all of them.
 
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#12
Well the deed has been done now just have to wait and see what happens. Had about a worse case with this one. Had nothing to dig with except a carving knife from the kitchen where I was staying. Was on a very steep slope so it made it hard to even dig but managed to get the whole tap root even though the bottom third had no dirt around it. Dug it up about 3 hours before we left and it was another 4 hour trip home with it sitting in the back of the car. Found a spot in my landscaping to put it in and got it in the ground. Used some bonide garden rich plant starter on it and will be using rhizotonic until it hopefully bounces back. Didn't look like the strongest tree to begin with and had a rough day but hopefully it will pull through.

image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg
 
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sorce

Nonsense Rascal
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#15
Yeah I couldn't leave it behind I had to try.
It will live.

I like to think that once you take a tree out of the shade, and give it some space...

They get happier and grow better.

Maybe keep it in some shade though.
Since its one of those.

Sorce
 

markyscott

Masterpiece
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#17
I'm guessing it's a buckeye. In Tennessee there are a bunch - Yellow, Red, Ohio Buckeye - maybe more. But those look like they could be buckeye leaves to me. If so, the color is just from growing in the shade.

Should do great in Ohio. It's the buckeye state!
 

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#19
I'm guessing it's a buckeye. In Tennessee there are a bunch - Yellow, Red, Ohio Buckeye - maybe more. But those look like they could be buckeye leaves to me. If so, the color is just from growing in the shade.

Should do great in Ohio. It's the buckeye state!
Well that would suck somewhat. Living in Ohio with a bunch of buckeye just to go to Tennessee and dig up a buckeye. Makes since though because I was really wondering why a Japanese maple would be growing wild in tenn. I know buckeye isn't great for bonsai but would one be better than another. Living in Ohio I did want to have a buckeye just for the novelty of it being the state tree.
 

markyscott

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#20
Well that would suck somewhat. Living in Ohio with a bunch of buckeye just to go to Tennessee and dig up a buckeye. Makes since though because I was really wondering why a Japanese maple would be growing wild in tenn. I know buckeye isn't great for bonsai but would one be better than another. Living in Ohio I did want to have a buckeye just for the novelty of it being the state tree.
Lol. I would have thought being an Ohioan you would have been trained to recognize buckeye from birth. Sleeping in beds lined with buckeye leaves, eating buckeye salads, wearing buckeye underwear, reciting the characteristics of buckeye flowers in kindergarten and all that. Good news is that it might not be an Ohio buckeye. Perhaps it's a Red or Yellow buckeye and you have something exotic after all.
 
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