What do you think of this front

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So this is the first bonsai I ever repotted and experimented with. As such, it's basically been abused, bad decisions made, branches broken, juvenile foliage, everything. But it actually has a pretty decent nebari under the soil that I've left alone in this pot for a few years a and every once in awhile I pull it out and try to figure out what I can do with it.

Because of my mistakes, the apex here is actually basically this one long shitty branch coming off of a large and unsightly branch, but I think both are hidden pretty well, and I can see a pyramid shape forming. This at least was a great lesson in how hiding defects can really change the feel of a tree.

I'm never expecting this to be much of a tree, but for the time being at least I feel like I can use it to experiment with and learn on. At this stage in my learning it's worth it, but as I get better it may be that it will eventually no longer be so.

Here' the tree from a poor angle to show off what I'm considering faults


IMG_2745.jpg

And with a turn, here's what I'm thinking could be a front... I thinking it could be passable with some cleanup, wiring, and filling in, but this could just be a lost cause. It's possible that taking the current apex off entirely is the way to go.


IMG_2743.jpg
 

Shibui

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Keep using it as a learning tree. At some stage inspiration will strike and there will be a bonsai.

I do not think the proposed front is worth pursuing. Apex is way to the back, lower branches are opposite so there's no clear direction for that tree.

Remove or jin the lower branches and leave a literati from the first view has some potential.

It is not clear where all the lower branches come from so hard to decide whether they could be used without the taller section.
 

63pmp

Mame
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Learn to graft. It's a practice tree, so start practicing. Don't like the apex? Graft on a new one in the right spot. Grafting is an essential bonsai technique.
 

Cadillactaste

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Wish you luck...suggest you add another species. These need dormancy, I've not known one person, personally who has had success growing juniper inside. But don't let it discourage you.

When choosing...take into consideration where you will winter it. Tropical can be brought inside for colder climates. Mine are currently residing inside under grow lights.

My bougainvillea...this past summer. A tropical which does well under grow lights indoors for winter.
result_1598718894641.jpg
 
Messages
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Keep using it as a learning tree. At some stage inspiration will strike and there will be a bonsai.

I do not think the proposed front is worth pursuing. Apex is way to the back, lower branches are opposite so there's no clear direction for that tree.

Remove or jin the lower branches and leave a literati from the first view has some potential.

It is not clear where all the lower branches come from so hard to decide whether they could be used without the taller section.

Great suggestion, and I think you're right. It looks a bit better than it is because the picture flattens it.

Learn to graft. It's a practice tree, so start practicing. Don't like the apex? Graft on a new one in the right spot. Grafting is an essential bonsai technique.

That's also a great idea... good excuse to try it in a low stakes scenario

Wish you luck...suggest you add another species. These need dormancy, I've not known one person, personally who has had success growing juniper inside. But don't let it discourage you.

When choosing...take into consideration where you will winter it. Tropical can be brought inside for colder climates. Mine are currently residing inside under grow lights.

My bougainvillea...this past summer. A tropical which does well under grow lights indoors for winter.
View attachment 349546

Yes, it lives outdoors, I just brought it in to mess around with it. I have a bougainvillea in development too!
 

River's Edge

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So this is the first bonsai I ever repotted and experimented with. As such, it's basically been abused, bad decisions made, branches broken, juvenile foliage, everything. But it actually has a pretty decent nebari under the soil that I've left alone in this pot for a few years a and every once in awhile I pull it out and try to figure out what I can do with it.

Because of my mistakes, the apex here is actually basically this one long shitty branch coming off of a large and unsightly branch, but I think both are hidden pretty well, and I can see a pyramid shape forming. This at least was a great lesson in how hiding defects can really change the feel of a tree.

I'm never expecting this to be much of a tree, but for the time being at least I feel like I can use it to experiment with and learn on. At this stage in my learning it's worth it, but as I get better it may be that it will eventually no longer be so.

Here' the tree from a poor angle to show off what I'm considering faults


View attachment 349446

And with a turn, here's what I'm thinking could be a front... I thinking it could be passable with some cleanup, wiring, and filling in, but this could just be a lost cause. It's possible that taking the current apex off entirely is the way to go.


View attachment 349447
If you wish to learn grafting? ok
If you wish to create Bonsai, choose a different starter!
Two key aspects are nebari and trunk. nebari is acceptable trunk is very poor. Inverse taper low down and very little movement is apparent!
Species suitable for cascade, trunk not suitable for cascade.
Your time is worth something, spending years to correct poor material is not very rewarding when the same amount of time and effort could result in superior results.
if you just wish to practice procedures for future use, nothing wrong with that.
Just a point of view, after all you get to decide what your time and effort is worth.
 
Messages
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If you wish to learn grafting? ok
If you wish to create Bonsai, choose a different starter!
Two key aspects are nebari and trunk. nebari is acceptable trunk is very poor. Inverse taper low down and very little movement is apparent!
Species suitable for cascade, trunk not suitable for cascade.
Your time is worth something, spending years to correct poor material is not very rewarding when the same amount of time and effort could result in superior results.
if you just wish to practice procedures for future use, nothing wrong with that.
Just a point of view, after all you get to decide what your time and effort is worth.

I think you just nailed one of the problems I've been having with this tree. You should have seen it when I first got it. It really looked like it wanted to be a cascade, but when I actually got in there, it never seemed like it would work at all. But I kept looking at it trying to figure it out, and then finally gave up and got this.

This one will fall by the wayside as I pick up other projects, but I think learning to graft is a great idea in the meantime.
 

BonsaiNaga13

Shohin
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So this is the first bonsai I ever repotted and experimented with. As such, it's basically been abused, bad decisions made, branches broken, juvenile foliage, everything. But it actually has a pretty decent nebari under the soil that I've left alone in this pot for a few years a and every once in awhile I pull it out and try to figure out what I can do with it.

Because of my mistakes, the apex here is actually basically this one long shitty branch coming off of a large and unsightly branch, but I think both are hidden pretty well, and I can see a pyramid shape forming. This at least was a great lesson in how hiding defects can really change the feel of a tree.

I'm never expecting this to be much of a tree, but for the time being at least I feel like I can use it to experiment with and learn on. At this stage in my learning it's worth it, but as I get better it may be that it will eventually no longer be so.

Here' the tree from a poor angle to show off what I'm considering faults


View attachment 349446

And with a turn, here's what I'm thinking could be a front... I thinking it could be passable with some cleanup, wiring, and filling in, but this could just be a lost cause. It's possible that taking the current apex off entirely is the way to go.


View attachment 349447
In the first picture it appears as if the "apex" is coming off of the lowest branch on the right. I'm not really sure what I'm looking at. But with some well placed wire, jins, and grafting you might be able too work this tree into something you're happy with given the flaws of the material but I don't suggest taking this to any conventions in the near future
 

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