what happens two weeks after pinching an elongating species?

Brian Van Fleet

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It would be much better if you showed the tree before you trimmed it back, the process of trimming it back, and then the result 2 weeks later.

Watching the video, it is impossible to see what has grown as a result of trimming. If you are trying to show results (by definition, this is an outcome of a preceding event), showing the preceding event is important. Do this against a solid background so what you are doing is clear to the viewer.

You might also consider getting someone else to hold the camera for you as you narrate to get steadier footage.
 
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Hi Brian, thank you for your reply. Here is the video showing the process of trimming. Regarding the background and the videography. I need to improve on that and I will with time. I hope the information is still useful at least for some people out there.

 

M. Frary

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What is an elongating species?
Doesn't every plant elongate as it grows?
Pines,junipers,elms,maples and every other tree elongates sometime.
 
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Good question Mike. For sure all trees grow and that generates elongation of branches. The term elongating species is not some formal botanical term. it is a term used by Ryan Neil from Bonsai Mirai to categorize essentially all species of evergreen conifers that are not either pines or junipers. This includes Taxus, redwoods or Larix (both deciduous conifers), Thuja, Chaemacyperis, Tsuga, Pseudotsuga, Picea, etc... based on the behaviour of their growth and response to pruning that is totally different from pines and junipers or broadleaf evergreens (like boxwood) or broadleaf deciduous. Elongating species you can pinch in the spring to stop elongation (and eventual hardening of that growth) and promote the growth of already existing internal growth or the development of buds in the interior (where depends on the nuances of the species).
 

Lazylightningny

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Great tutorial and results Rafael. How many terminal tips would you estimate that you pinched from each branch?

ps, Pinching as I understand it is a refinement technique. My spruce are currently in development, so all I am doing is pruning branches to viable growth down the branch, and pruning all bifurcations to just two branches.
 
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