what is the most difficult to kill species for bonsai in general?

BonsaiSniper

Yamadori
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What soil do they like?
and any more info on the species.
 

penumbra

Omono
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For temperate evergreen, juniper. For deciduous there are many; elm, maple, hornbeam etc. IMO :)
 

0soyoung

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What makes it easy to kill?
  • lack/excess of water (including immersion, maybe)
  • lack/excess of sunlight (including solar heating of pots, for example)
  • lack/excess of mineral nutrients (dog peed on my tree, maybe)
  • sub-freezing temperatures / temperatures above 104F/40C / temperatures always >40F/5C (poor growing environment)
  • soil/water alkalinity (hard water)
  • indigenous pathogens
  • indigenous animals
  • ?
What is the criteria for 'easy'?
 

Underdog

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You're in the same zone as me. My toughest customers have been elm and hornbeam, Norway spruce and Taxus, Azalea, dwarf rhodie and Lilac. Boxwood have been indestructible here.
 

0soyoung

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I’m about to start spraying roundup on my bonsai’.. keeps everything else I spray it on alive!
It seems to nicely stunt growth in the proper dosages. I had some bindweed growing at the base of a landscape azalea. I immersed the bindweed vines in a tub of bottle recommended diluted RoundUp for most of a summer. Growth on that side of the azalea was stunted for the following two seasons - short internodes, smaller leaves, just like one would want for bonsai. Think about weaker dilutions as root drenches.

IOW, do it right and it could be a breakthrough that makes you famous in the bonsai world. Might even make a profitable business for you.
 

PABonsai

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It seems to nicely stunt growth in the proper dosages. I had some bindweed growing at the base of a landscape azalea. I immersed the bindweed vines in a tub of bottle recommended diluted RoundUp for most of a summer. Growth on that side of the azalea was stunted for the following two seasons - short internodes, smaller leaves, just like one would want for bonsai. Think about weaker dilutions as root drenches.

IOW, do it right and it could be a breakthrough that makes you famous in the bonsai world. Might even make a profitable business for you.
Spreading roundup resistance sounds like a horrible business model, especially if you still want to use it for killing weeds.
 

Tulsabonsigh

Shohin
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Of all the things I’d ever want to be famous for, being the guy who discovered how to correctly poison his bonsai just right was not my first hope!
but!!! I’m actually interested in trying. I’ll practice with eastern red cedar, box woods, and maples. Lots of that material around here.
 

PABonsai

Chumono
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I don't know about hardest to kill but maples are tough. They seem to sprout buds after anything.
 

TN_Jim

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What soil do they like?
and any more info on the species.
Privet in the southeast U.S.
...arguably the most invasive species in the region and beyond the southeast region. If you have or ever get one, never let it fruit or flower.

Ligustrum sinense Lour.
 

brentwood

Mame
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I always wondered if anyone grew Rose of Sharon - I don't think you could kill that with a stake and holy water.... Not sure if the leaves would reduce, but the blooms would be pretty spectacular.

Brent
 
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