What is the success rate of ground layers?

Kent E

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What is the success rate of ground layers? I have a decent Chinese maple in the yard because which was stunted but don't know what the roots look like other than there is a quarter missing because of a mowing incident. If it needs a ground layer, I'd try it, but don't want to lose the whole tree. Thoughts?
 

Vance Wood

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What is the success rate of ground layers? I have a decent Chinese maple in the yard because which was stunted but don't know what the roots look like other than there is a quarter missing because of a mowing incident. If it needs a ground layer, I'd try it, but don't want to lose the whole tree. Thoughts?
I'm not sure what you mean by Chinese Maple? Do you have the botanical name? Ground layers are generally very successful for most trees, but I am not sure what I understand as a ground layer is the same thing you understand as a ground layer. Before anyone says yes or no, it should be determined what tree we are truly dealing with and an agreement on the methods of ground layering.
 

Tachigi

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Vance, he is referring to a Trident also known as a Chinese maple . For a chuckle see here, note there comment on the root system.

Yes Kent they will ground layer.
 
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Kent E

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Sorry about that. Actually the whole message was illegible, I guess I was in a hurry. What I meant to say was "Japanese maple". I think it's a bloodgood. There is a section that was hit by a mower years and years ago and and roots are missing in that quarter. Now that might look cool, who knows. Only way to really tell is when it's dug up. But if its lame looking and the roots are big and narly and no good, than it sounds from you guys that a ground layer is worth the risk.

Here is what I've read on ground layers. You dig up the tree and at some determined depth (I don't know) you tie a wire around it and let it grow and automajically roots grow out from that point and hopefully they are evenly proportioned and will provide good trunk flare.

It's just a tad scary because I don't want to lose it and it seems like it's going to be a great tree for a novice such as myself.
 

Ashbarns

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Kent you don't have to dig the tree. You can layer it inground using the Watanabe method. I have been using this method with 100% success for many years. I first read about it in an early edition of Bonsai Today and they recently reprinted the article in no. 103. Trees I have layered are deciduous which will work on your Maple. Good luck.


Ash :):)
 
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AndyWilson

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Vance, he is referring to a Trident also known as a Chinese maple . For a chuckle see here, note there comment on the root system.

Yes Kent they will ground layer.
Hey Tachigi, i Believe MWEB is purley south african, and that would probably explain the comment about the root systems, tridents don't much like a lot of the native soil here from what ive found. Maybe whoever wrote this was just gong on his/her observations of it in local conditions.
 

Kent E

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Thanks ash, I will have to dig up the tree because the house is being sold. Hopefully the leaves will have dropped at this point and I'll wire the roots then.
 
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