What is this growing on my hemlock?

Gsquared

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I’ve got a couple of collected hemlocks that have a few spots of this growing on the branches. Both were repotted last spring and seem to have recovered well. I suspect that it is some kind of parasitic mistletoe type of plant.

Anyone know what it is and how to get rid of/control it?

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Zach2

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This just came up in another thread:

 

Atom#28

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This just came up in another thread:


Yep. My ponderosa has that same bizzarre swelling of the limbs, too :(
 

Atom#28

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Sorry to say, but your pondy might be a goner. It is not easy to get rid of mistletoe and it can really weaken a tree if the infection is widespread.


I have been studying it all day and have come to the same conclusion. I think I’m gonna wire it and style it and practice every technique I can, then throw it into an enormous pyre and drink a glass of bourbon.
 

TN_Jim

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Seems like you could remove and wrap entire area with raffia or tape...

..as in, being a hemiparasite, and completely depriving it of photosynthesis and emergence from branch, it will only have so much energy to burrow through branch before it dies...?
 

Atom#28

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Seems like you could remove and wrap entire area with raffia or tape...

..as in, being a hemiparasite, and completely depriving it of photosynthesis and emergence from branch, it will only have so much energy to burrow through branch before it dies...?
I did something similar with the same principle in mind: I removed everything I could see with a sharp blade, and covered every affected area with a generous dose of cut paste, in the hopes it would starve the little bastards of light...,
 

bonsaichile

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Seems like you could remove and wrap entire area with raffia or tape...

..as in, being a hemiparasite, and completely depriving it of photosynthesis and emergence from branch, it will only have so much energy to burrow through branch before it dies...?
that depends on the species. In some species, the amount of energy gained by photosynthesis is marginal.
 

TN_Jim

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that depends on the species. In some species, the amount of energy gained by photosynthesis is marginal.
This is interesting. Parasitic plants are just honestly fascinating. So, if the branches were wrapped (I’m just trying to understand this) and the species were of the sort you say, how would this present itself?

Do such species just live inside and off of the fat of the branch?...like a sort of dormancy or lifecycle stasis?

With the thought that all biota have some drive to reproduce I’m guessing these have adapted unique ways to flower against adverse conditions. Do these species burrow farther or contort the branch until it breaks off?Ive read that mistletoe does not always need a host, but at the same time on a mature tree do little to no damage. I have certainly seen instances of this (the kissin kinda ones) around every thanksgiving on oaks I’ve been seeing since being a child.

Do you know what genera do what you’re describing? And while you’re at it can you get a doctorate in parasitic plants!!? Sorry, thank you.
 

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