What makes a good/great/why the hell is the chunk of rock selling for $100 on a FB auction, rock slab?

Messages
181
Reaction score
428
Location
Alaska
USDA Zone
2
I have no idea what makes a $100 rock but I bet you see some cool stuff. I spent a lot of time around Lake Powell when I was younger and there are some insane rock formations in the area.
 

Shibui

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
5,088
Reaction score
9,668
Location
Yackandandah, Australia
USDA Zone
9?
Rock slabs:
Look for -
Thin. Rock is incredibly heavy. Thick slabs weigh too much to move if they are wide enough to be useful but the slab still needs to be thick enough to be strong. I carried some large, thin granite slabs all the way down off the hillside only to have them break in pieces in the car 😢 Size will obviously depend on the size of the trees you plant to grow on them. Allow enough extra size to show that it is a rock slab after the tree is planted.
Strong rock. Some kinds of rock erode quickly or split in cold weather (stay clear of shales but they generally don't form good slabs anyway)

Do not underestimate the additional problems of growing trees on rock. Even the hardest rocks are porous and will wick water away from the soil and roots and evaporate it into surrounding air like a radiator does for heat. Any planting with rock will require more water. The more exposed rock the more water required. I gave up trying to keep trees alive on rock slabs many years ago.
 

rockm

Spuds Moyogi
Messages
11,289
Reaction score
15,815
Location
Fairfax Va.
USDA Zone
7
Rock slabs make great bonsai containers, depending on a few things--species, conditions and owner ability (it takes a bit of ingenuity to get trees established on a flat (ish) surface, but it can work very well once done). I've had amur maple growing on a ceramic slab for a decade now. They can also be used as Jiita in bonsai display--something like a big coaster for display trees instead of a stand..Good ones can be well over $100. In Arizona, you may going run into sandstone and softer rock in some areas. Opt for granite (or other kinds of igneous rock) if you can find them.

 

hinmo24t

Masterpiece
Messages
2,433
Reaction score
3,002
Location
Dartmouth Massachusetts
USDA Zone
7A
I'm very curious, because on my hikes I come across a lot of rock slabs. Just wondering what I should be looking for exactly.
interesting concept. might seem fruitful at first glance but im putting at least $50 on processing the sale of a heavy rock.
not sure the one youre referencing, but if it is heavy, i think of hauling more than 1 out of a hike, posting it for sale attractively,
and shipping the weight of it.

wouldnt have to worry about damage during freight but its just a wild concept. i cant imagine the discretionary spending
on those who would spend hard earned money on a rock from online, but then again i didnt know certain places have few, like the
person from Houston who made a thread about it earlier
 

Maiden69

Chumono
Messages
615
Reaction score
714
Location
Boerne, TX
USDA Zone
8b
LOL, and you are complaining about a $100 stone...
 

hinmo24t

Masterpiece
Messages
2,433
Reaction score
3,002
Location
Dartmouth Massachusetts
USDA Zone
7A
i wonder what the average ROI (return on investment) is for the vendors who offer rocks and bonsai in
excess of $2,000 a piece. 3 years? 5 years?

do those who follow them ever notice the inventory turns over and sells, drops from the market?

the bonsai need to be maintained, rocks, not so much? space, inventory, etc.

fascinating
 

Pitoon

Masterpiece
Messages
4,339
Reaction score
8,988
Location
Southern Maryland
USDA Zone
7b
LOL, and you are complaining about a $100 stone...
Those are handmade by Jan.
 

rockm

Spuds Moyogi
Messages
11,289
Reaction score
15,815
Location
Fairfax Va.
USDA Zone
7
i wonder what the average ROI (return on investment) is for the vendors who offer rocks and bonsai in
excess of $2,000 a piece. 3 years? 5 years?

do those who follow them ever notice the inventory turns over and sells, drops from the market?

the bonsai need to be maintained, rocks, not so much? space, inventory, etc.

fascinating

There is a big difference between planting slabs and $2,000+ suiseki (notwithstanding the skyhigh prices of handmade cement planting stones on Mirai). I wouldn't pay that much for a cement slab, but they are works of ceramic art and NOT STONES.

Ever try to find a decent suiseki? I mean in the wild, not off of ebay (Which is mostly a collection of fakes or overly "worked" stones). Decent suiseki and scholars stones are not common and they are very expensive. The best examples are not for sale. The best of the best in Japan and China have names, just as important katana blades do.

and FWIW, the best suiseki ARE maintained. They, like pots, acquire a patina from handling.



One of my favorites "waterfall" stones at the Bonsai and Penjing Museum:
 

Attachments

  • waterfallstone.jpg
    waterfallstone.jpg
    130 KB · Views: 32

Maiden69

Chumono
Messages
615
Reaction score
714
Location
Boerne, TX
USDA Zone
8b
I would love to learn how to make them. They look very realistic.
He didn't go into "details", just brushed over the basics... it's the bonus content of this course.
 

sorce

Nonsense Rascal
Messages
31,834
Reaction score
43,724
Location
Berwyn, Il
USDA Zone
6.2
🤢
Rocks should be sourced from directly under the trees that are directly under your nose.

I'd rather give thirty good homeless people $100 to find a good rock, because it's surely more valuable.

That's an expensive fish.


Sorce
 
Messages
243
Reaction score
518
Location
Page, AZ Elevation: 1326m / 4350feet
USDA Zone
8B
🤢
Rocks should be sourced from directly under the trees that are directly under your nose.

I'd rather give thirty good homeless people $100 to find a good rock, because it's surely more valuable.

That's an expensive fish.


Sorce
It took me 10,000 hours to learn how to put the toilet lid down.
 
Messages
243
Reaction score
518
Location
Page, AZ Elevation: 1326m / 4350feet
USDA Zone
8B
Rock slabs make great bonsai containers, depending on a few things--species, conditions and owner ability (it takes a bit of ingenuity to get trees established on a flat (ish) surface, but it can work very well once done). I've had amur maple growing on a ceramic slab for a decade now. They can also be used as Jiita in bonsai display--something like a big coaster for display trees instead of a stand..Good ones can be well over $100. In Arizona, you may going run into sandstone and softer rock in some areas. Opt for granite (or other kinds of igneous rock) if you can find them.

Some of the sandstone I run into around here is very hard, while some will crumble apart if lightly tapped with a hammer. We also have a lot of Chert and rocks I can't even identify, but are hard. Also, a lot of petrified wood in my area and I know several secret spots I've discovered. Getting permits to harvest petrified wood for commercial use isn't difficult, I've done it before, and a permit isn't needed if it's for personal use and allows up to 250lbs a day to be carried out.

Example of rocks I encounter around here that I don't even know how to identify. Looks like sandstone but is hard as hell.
2B0EE28F-C5B0-4621-8CCE-CF56A6D0D8C5.jpeg
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom