What Pines Do Well In Central Florida?

Isilwen

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While I love maple trees and ficus, I am curious if any pines do well in Florida other than the two native ones?
 

Paradox

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Japanese black pines will probably be your only option for Florida.

Not sure if Japanese red pines would be ok.

Other species (scots, mugo, Japanese white pine) commonly used for bonsai need colder temperatures.
 

Dav4

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Several native pines in SE would be fine🤔.
Which ones, Potty? I'm not intimately familiar with native FL pines, but the ones I am aware of have extremely long needles. The only native pines to the SE that are worth a try are Virginia and Pitch pines and neither will grow in FL.
 

penumbra

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I was thinking there are many pines in the Mediterranean area, but I suppose most of them have rather long needles. Still, it would be good to here from people overseas.
 

Maiden69

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There you go...

JBP should do ok in the northern area of FL, loblolly pine is a good option. In Puerto Rico we have plenty of Caribbean pine along the northern shore. I think it looks similar to JBP. I think I may consider having my sister send me some seeds to see how it fairs over here.

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Arlithrien

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+1 my little loblolly is thriving in Tampa, brought down from Georgia where volunteers sprout up everywhere.
 

It's Kev

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I was thinking there are many pines in the Mediterranean area, but I suppose most of them have rather long needles. Still, it would be good to here from people overseas.
Aleppo pine, but i've never encountered one, so dont know if it's a good bonsai species or not
 

Potawatomi13

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Which ones, Potty? I'm not intimately familiar with native FL pines, but the ones I am aware of have extremely long needles. The only native pines to the SE that are worth a try are Virginia and Pitch pines and neither will grow in FL.
SE not just FL. Not being resident myself cannot answer that. Do not insult tribal names!
 

Potawatomi13

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Horticultural info is as desert Pine Aleppo does poorly with much rain/wetnesss of soil due to root rot problems. Saw these in Phoenix so did some research;).
 

HorseloverFat

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I was thinking there are many pines in the Mediterranean area, but I suppose most of them have rather long needles. Still, it would be good to here from people overseas.
My thought, as well... Check Native Pines growing in Andalusia through the southern Balkans.
 

Dav4

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SE not just FL. Not being resident myself cannot answer that. Do not insult tribal names!
Then you apparently don't have a clue. I lived in GA for 12 years and am familiar with the native pines in the N GA region. I named the only 2 native species I'm familiar with that have truly good bonsai potential and I know they're a non-starter in FL. Loblolly is ok for bigger trees but I still have questions about reducing the needle size, which is anywhere between 5 and 8+ inches in the landscape...
 
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Dave, have you seen this blog post by Michael Hagedorn concerning Andrew Robson's Loblolly?
I'd say the needles are 2"-3", still long but it works on a large tree as you mentioned, this one back buds like crazy.

 

Dav4

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Dave, have you seen this blog post by Michael Hagedorn concerning Andrew Robson's Loblolly?
I'd say the needles are 2"-3", still long but it works on a large tree as you mentioned, this one back buds like crazy.

I know John Geangel in SC has worked w/ Loblolly and noted decandling was a viable option to get that 2nd flush with shorter needles. Still, even my larger pines look better with needles shorter than 2-3 inches. I suppose if the OP can't grow JBP, Loblolly may be the best option.
 

Isilwen

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Okay, so Japanese Black Pine it is then. Not a fan of the native pines here in Central Florida. If I was up north then I would have spruce and firs that I could work with, but sadly I'm not up north.
 

namnhi

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Okay, so Japanese Black Pine it is then. Not a fan of the native pines here in Central Florida. If I was up north then I would have spruce and firs that I could work with, but sadly I'm not up north.
That's a good choice!
 
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