What type of bonsai is this?

robert.m

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I have this bonsai tree and need help identifying it. Also how should I take care of it? I am new to this and do not how to take care of it.

how much do I need to water it and can it survive indoors in the winter months in Canada?
 

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Zach Smith

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It appears to be an invisible bonsai :). They don't require any care and can be maintained in your home or car.

But seriously, post a photo.
 
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Its a schefflera, to my eyes. Nigel Saunders on youtube has a very meticulously documented playlist on his schefflera. Its a tropical so keep it inside during winter getting it as much light as possible. After the last frost in your area and temperatures are consistently above 50 degrees at night, i would put ot outside for the summer.

For now, remove the rocks if they are glued on. Water it when the soil is no longer damp to the touch. You can stick your finger in a little and it should feel just almost dry before watering.
 

Michael P

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Now we see the photo! It is a dwarf schefflera, Schefflera arbicola. This is one of the easiest bonsai species to keep indoors. It will still like a summer vacation outdoors when the weather is warm enough.
 

sorce

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Welcome to Crazy!

Sorce
 

Zach Smith

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Schefflera. Like any other species, outdoors whenever possible and indoors when freezing out. Those surface rocks look glued on. Pry some off in a few spots so you can be sure the soil is moist. Once a week watering inside will likely do the trick. Come spring, get those rocks off and repot into decent soil.
 

robert.m

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Schefflera. Like any other species, outdoors whenever possible and indoors when freezing out. Those surface rocks look glued on. Pry some off in a few spots so you can be sure the soil is moist. Once a week watering inside will likely do the trick. Come spring, get those rocks off and repot into decent soil.
How much water should I give it? I have a big spray bottle that I use. Aprox how many sprays should I do per time? Is it easy to overwater?
 

DonovanC

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How much water should I give it? I have a big spray bottle that I use. Aprox how many sprays should I do per time? Is it easy to overwater?
Water when the surface is dry. We’ll assume it’s living in potting soil if it has those glued on rocks, so if that’s the case you’ll not water as often. Give it a good soaking each time. Don’t let it dry out completely, but also don’t let it stay super wet. You want some drying out on the surface between waterings.
 

robert.m

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Okay, the rocks aren’t actually glued on but should I remove them? Also should I spray the leaves? And is there any fertilizer I should use?
 
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Look up basic indoor plant care. Spraying will only superficially wet the soil. It could be stone dry underneath and youll never know, thats why its best to check with your fingers. Soaking method is best for these smaller plants. Fill up a container of water and lay the pot in until the water comes up just below the outside lip of the pot. Leave it there for 5 minutes and then take it out. Let the excess water run off and youre good to go.

Fertilizing indoor plants can be done once a month with liquid feed according to directions.
 

leatherback

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the rocks aren’t actually glued on but should I remove them?
Remove them for two reasons:

- So you can tell what the tree is growing in (If it is pebbles all the way, care is very different from potting soil)
- You need to see what it happening with the soil to decide when to water
 

Zach Smith

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Okay, the rocks aren’t actually glued on but should I remove them? Also should I spray the leaves? And is there any fertilizer I should use?
No, if the rocks aren't glued on just leave them till you repot. I wouldn't spray the leaves, that could encourage mold formation if you don't have enough air movement. As for fertilizer, what leatherback said.
 

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