What's the story here...?

Woocash

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It’s pretty cool is what it is. I have no idea really, just spitballing, but could it be that’s where the transpiration is taking place / or conversely, isn’t? And it’s too cold to evaporate perhaps... Gotta love nature.
 

fredman

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Yeah, I bet it's pushing 100% humidity in the cold frame and you're seeing some condensation develop.
The cold frame door and roof is left open so it don't heat up during the day...also for air circulation.
The humidity is very high the last few days from the constant rain, so it can be something to do with that.
What baffles me is there is other fuschias, and other trees in there, but only this one does this.
 

Harunobu

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Those droplets must be centered around the area where the most guttation happens. Then the water molecules minimize their energy by forming these droplets. No need for them to move. The droplet spacing seems to vaguely resemble those spikey edge spacing.
 

cmeg1

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Yea these need breeze more than one would think.Can actually get deficiencies for the minerals that are assimilated through the transpiration process.....namely calcium.Get layers of stale air under leaf that are super humid and halt transnspiration completely and over heat them too.
Maybe tropical plants definately have different capabilites👍
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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I keep a fan running 24/7 in my well house where I store trees for the winter. Still, humid air is a set up for disaster. A small fan, 20 cm diameter, pointed at a wall above the trees will keep the air moving and buoyant. Leaves should gently wave in the breeze.

Try that, all your plants in the cold frame will look better.
 

fredman

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I keep a fan running 24/7 in my well house where I store trees for the winter. Still, humid air is a set up for disaster. A small fan, 20 cm diameter, pointed at a wall above the trees will keep the air moving and buoyant. Leaves should gently wave in the breeze.

Try that, all your plants in the cold frame will look better.
I have them in a cold frame for winter. I purposefully leave the door and roof open for circulation...obviously not enough.
 

Forsoothe!

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Those droplets must be centered around the area where the most guttation happens. Then the water molecules minimize their energy by forming these droplets. No need for them to move. The droplet spacing seems to vaguely resemble those spikey edge spacing.
guttation Had to look it up. It's always nice to learn a brand-new term!
 

Forsoothe!

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I have a lot of unpleasant people on ignore. It's the best feature of this site!
 

leatherback

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I have a lot of unpleasant people on ignore. It's the best feature of this site!
Problem is, you miss half of the conversation, and very frequently post replies long after that answer was already given. As in the above. I provided a direct link to wikipedia so others do not need to look for it.

Of course, unpleasant is personal. Is every person who has a different vision unpleasant to you?
 

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