When to air layer?

Karmage

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So I have some large pines in my tree as well as what I think is a maple which is right up against the house so it will definitely have to be taken out at some point but I was wondering when should I try to air layer it? I’ve never done it before but figured it would be a good time to try. Here are some pics of them.
 

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Mellow Mullet

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I have never air layered a pine, but on maples, I wait until the spring foliage has extended a bit. I did two last year and both were successful.

Maybe someone else will make a recommendation for pines.
 
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From what I understand it is very difficult to layer pines. Those I have heard to have success used clonex rooting hormone and waited two years or more.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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The photo of a conifer you posted is a spruce. Spruce are not known to air layer, though one never knows until you try. In general for most trees, I would not start an air layer until after the first flush of growth has hardened off, in Ohio, probably middle or late June would be a good time to start air layers.

Maples and most deciduous trees like elms air layer relatively quickly, roots can appear in as little as 8 to 12 weeks.. Air layers are usually left on until you see roots are several inches long, and wrapping around in the bag, or pot that contains the air layer. For deciduous, usually you can separate them in September in Ohio. Some deciduous trees will not air layer for you, at all. But I don't have a comprehensive list. If in doubt, go ahead and try. either it will work, or it won't.

Pines, spruce and many other conifers are notorious for being either slow or impossible to air layer. The few pines I successfully air layered did not produce roots until their second year. Majority of air layers on pines failed. I once left an air layer in place for 4 years on a Japanese white pine, and it still failed. But I have successfully air layered a Japanese black pine, several times, but with only 4 successes out of 10 attempts.

Good luck.
 

evanjt

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I just removed a JBP pine air layer that I started in the beginning of January. I used moss and a pot with a little bit of rooting hormone powder
 

Stan Kengai

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I think layering technique is more important than timing with deciduous trees. Above is a video from Graham Potter that demonstrates technique. As far as pines, check Muranaka bonsai nursery's blog for tips on layering.
 

sorce

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Not a maple!

Sorce
 

Melospiza

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Yeah that's not a maple. Maples have leaves arranged opposite from each other in pairs, which is eventually reflected in their branching too. You don't see that here, reminds me rather of a Hackberry.
 

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