Where to buy Beech Bonsai!

D1raq

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Where can I find a beech bonsai in the U.S? Preferably in the pacific NW but not mandatory.

Thank you,
Derek
 

Forsoothe!

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I found a nice one last October at a Landscaper's supply. $75 Grafted, but two (now) trunks emerging
2018_1007RandazzoTwo0001.JPG2018_1007RandazzoTwo0002.JPG2018_1007RandazzoTwo0003.JPG2018_1007RandazzoTwo0008.JPG2018_1007RandazzoTwo0009.JPG arising at exactly at/above the graft so it cannot be differentiated from a normal trunk division into two branches. Also, lots of close-in ramified branches so not too many years to hide the cuts. I'd rather be lucky than good...
 

Bonsai Nut

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I know I am not answering your question directly, but beech has a few secrets that make it moderately difficult material to work with. Because of this, they aren't as common in many bonsai nurseries. I am probably telling you what you already know :)
 

Forsoothe!

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I know I am not answering your question directly, but beech has a few secrets that make it moderately difficult material to work with. Because of this, they aren't as common in many bonsai nurseries. I am probably telling you what you already know :)
This would probably be a good time for me to hear it. Please expand upon that. I got lots of time...
 

Bonsai Nut

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This would probably be a good time for me to hear it. Please expand upon that. I got lots of time...

(1) Beech bark is extremely sensitive. It scars easily and does not heal well - if ever. Developing a proper trunk with taper without scars is extremely challenging. It is very difficult to wire beech branches without scarring them indelibly.
(2) Beech does not develop secondary buds. The primary buds are large, long and fragile. It is easy to damage them or knock them off entirely - killing a branch tip or setting back your design considerably.
(3) Leaf size tends to be large, but due to lack of secondary buds, trees cannot be defoliated to reduce leaf size. Instead, you need to trim leaves every other year to reduce leaf size.
(4) Beech is very apically dominant. The only way to balance strength is to leaf trim the upper branches while leaving the lower branches untouched. Balancing branch strength, leaf size, and ramification is extremely difficult.

This is why it is extremely rare to see a great beech bonsai... even though beech trees are very common in the wild.
 

Paulpash

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@Walter Pall Do you employ any special techniques for Beech other than your twice yearly shear back? What a great tree! Did it start as a collected stump?
 

Forsoothe!

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Walter Pall

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NO, let grow new growth for six weeks then cut back to two buds. If the tree is very strong at the same time totally defoliate. If not strong do nothing. then a second flush will occur. let grow freely and cut back before middle of August again. Then wait until foliage is off. Around end of November or later do detailed editing of crown. Repeat for ten years and you will have a tree like this. If you follow the instructions and pinch new growth as soon as ii is out.you will never ever get there. Also only repot when absolutely necessary. Every repotting will weaken the tree considerably. Do NOT cut roots at repotting. So simply do exactly the contrary of what they tell you and you will get there. No kidding.

Methods can only be judged by repeated results. Even if it all sounds crazy. If the result can be repeated many times the method is working better than conventional wisdom. Warning: If you are not reading carefully what I write you might ruin or kill the tree. It seems that this is hard to get. I have written this for years now and still get these questions. For example folks will read this and still pinch! I cannot believe it. No pinching at all - ever - if your really want to get there!
 
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August44

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NO, let grow new growth for six weeks then cut back to two buds. If the tree is very strong at the same time totally defoliate. If not strong do nothing. then a second flush will occur. let grow freely and cut back before middle of August again. Then wait until foliage is off. Around end of November or later do detailed editing of crown. Repeat for ten years and you will have a tree like this. If you follow the instructions and pinch new growth as soon as ii is out.you will never ever get there. Also only repot when absolutely necessary. Every repotting will weaken the tree considerably. Do NOT cut roots at repotting. So simply do exactly the contrary of what they tell you and you will get there. No kidding.

Methods can only be judged by repeated results. Even if it all sounds crazy. If the result can be repeated many times the method is working better than conventional wisdom. Warning: If you are not reading carefully what I write you might ruin or kill the tree. It seems that this is hard to get. I have written this for years now and still get these questions. For example folks will read this and still pinch! I cannot believe it. No pinching at all - ever - if your really want to get there!

Mr Pall...I have ten European Beeches seedling coming soon from Bill V. They are coming grown 5 to a pot. I was planning on making a beech forest with them, or at least 7 of them and then planting a clump of three with the rest of them. I have read your above post several time and understand no pinching and cut back after 6 weeks. You say not to trim the roots when re-potting...when would you cut the roots then?? You also suggest "doing a detailed editing of the crown" at the end of November. Can I assume that this is when to "edit" the rest of the trees also? What about doing this "editing" and then getting very cold weather? I am a bit new here so maybe you could help me along with these Beeches. I don't want to end up with a disaster. Help appreciated, and I do well with honest help. If I am trying to do something that is a wreck waiting to happen, just say so. Thanks, Peter
 

Doug J

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Where can I find a beech bonsai in the U.S? Preferably in the pacific NW but not mandatory.

Thank you,
Derek
If you want "pre-bonsai" material, Bill Valavanis at International Bonsai has some. I just bought some for a forest planting I am doing.
 

Doug J

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Mr Pall...I have ten European Beeches seedling coming soon from Bill V. They are coming grown 5 to a pot. I was planning on making a beech forest with them, or at least 7 of them and then planting a clump of three with the rest of them. I have read your above post several time and understand no pinching and cut back after 6 weeks. You say not to trim the roots when re-potting...when would you cut the roots then?? You also suggest "doing a detailed editing of the crown" at the end of November. Can I assume that this is when to "edit" the rest of the trees also? What about doing this "editing" and then getting very cold weather? I am a bit new here so maybe you could help me along with these Beeches. I don't want to end up with a disaster. Help appreciated, and I do well with honest help. If I am trying to do something that is a wreck waiting to happen, just say so. Thanks, Peter
Ha! Just read this after my previous post. That's exactly what I did...bought 10 and made a 7 tree grouping. Good luck
 

Walter Pall

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Mr Pall...I have ten European Beeches seedling coming soon from Bill V. They are coming grown 5 to a pot. I was planning on making a beech forest with them, or at least 7 of them and then planting a clump of three with the rest of them. I have read your above post several time and understand no pinching and cut back after 6 weeks. You say not to trim the roots when re-potting...when would you cut the roots then?? You also suggest "doing a detailed editing of the crown" at the end of November. Can I assume that this is when to "edit" the rest of the trees also? What about doing this "editing" and then getting very cold weather? I am a bit new here so maybe you could help me along with these Beeches. I don't want to end up with a disaster. Help appreciated, and I do well with honest help. If I am trying to do something that is a wreck waiting to happen, just say so. Thanks, Peter

Peter,

on very young tree, like those that are younger than 20 years you can cut roots, but not as much as you were taught. You should also repot these every three to four years. On older beech I try to totally avoid cutting roots. I also repot these only when the root ball is so dense that water and air can hardly get though. This happens in my garden after seven or so years or even later.

Detailed editing of the crown I do at the very end of fall. I first rip off all the brown foliage and then carefully look at every single branch and decide about shortening, keeping, pulling with guy wire etc. At this time of the year I do not wire and bend as many of these branches will be dad in spring. This editing can be done any time from November to April. Beeches MUST be protected from cold anyway.

About cold weather: your should know BECHES ARE NOT HARDY IN A BONSAI POT EVEN IF THE BIG TREE IS HARDY AROUND THERE. Sorry for shouting - it was just to save the life of some beeches. Beeches as well as oaks (which are closely related) must be protected form frost in the roots. The top is somehow hardy, the roots are not much. So my beeches are always in a greenhous or similar in winter until end of March. In this environment the buds start to open about three to four weeks earlier than outside. This is a very dangerous time. The tree should sit outside when it is warm, but must be protected from late frosts which can appear in April or even up to the beginning of May. Again, the new foliage is somehow a little frost proof. The new fine roots which appear at the same time are absolutely not frost proof. If in one night the whole soil freezes the tree is probably gone because the fine new roots have died.
 

August44

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Thanks for the response Mr Pall. I am able to keep any tree that needs protection in a temp controlled shed with two windows so no problem with that. I am doing the in and out dance presently with all my deciduous trees. Best regards, Peter
 

nover18

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Peter,

Detailed editing of the crown I do at the very end of fall. I first rip off all the brown foliage and then carefully look at every single branch and decide about shortening, keeping, pulling with guy wire etc. At this time of the year I do not wire and bend as many of these branches will be dad in spring. This editing can be done any time from November to April. Beeches MUST be protected from cold anyway.
Walter, do you wire beech at all other than using guy wire? If so, when do you suggest to wire? Early spring as growth is extending?
 

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