White-bark pines worth collecting? (blister rust)

andrewiles

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I'm curious whether folks here think Pinus albicaulis is worth collecting. We seem to have some nice specimens here in the PWN for those willing to get the permits and do the necessary driving and hiking, but I've read they are being decimated by blister rust, esp. albicaulis, with no cure beyond proactive branch removal.

I've read that fall fungicide application can be a preventative method, when the fungus is moving from the alternate host, but not much info on how effective it is.
 

Potawatomi13

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Personally would love to have a good WBP Yamadori if having any room to keep another tree. Dick Benbow your area had some of these. See if this one can be found ? Actually I believe disease CAN be treated less destructively. Seems it was Crater Lake park ranger told me they preferred finding resistant trees to propagate offspring instead of spraying Indicating spraying CAN be done. Contact"https://whitebarkfound.org" and ask for best info on this.
 

August44

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I collect White Bark Pine (Pinus albicaulis) and Western White Pine (Pinus monticola-Idaho State tree) in the Elk Horn Mts where I live. Both are 5 needle pines. I don't believe either will be destroyed by the blister rust. They will just adapt and become resistant to it. As stated by Potawatomi13, the Forest service has been planting a resistant varieties for several years. IMO, the Western White Pine would be a better choice for bonsai because of it's form and rougher bark when aged. The WBP has smooth bark for the most part. I also believe that the WBP is a weaker tree compared to the WWP. If you have Lodge Pole Pines in your area, they would be a better choice for bonsai. I tried several times to get in touch with Dick Benbow in the past and he does not respond.
 

Potawatomi13

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I collect White Bark Pine (Pinus albicaulis) and Western White Pine (Pinus monticola-Idaho State tree) in the Elk Horn Mts where I live. Both are 5 needle pines. I don't believe either will be destroyed by the blister rust. They will just adapt and become resistant to it. As stated by Potawatomi13, the Forest service has been planting a resistant varieties for several years. IMO, the Western White Pine would be a better choice for bonsai because of it's form and rougher bark when aged. The WBP has smooth bark for the most part. I also believe that the WBP is a weaker tree compared to the WWP. If you have Lodge Pole Pines in your area, they would be a better choice for bonsai. I tried several times to get in touch with Dick Benbow in the past and he does not respond.
Thanks for response. Personal love of White barks comes from many taking on Bristlecone like picturesque growth, naturally short needles and really cool little hand grenade cones🥰. Elkhorn Mts anywhere near Cusick Mtn?
 

August44

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Thanks for response. Personal love of White barks comes from many taking on Bristlecone like picturesque growth, naturally short needles and really cool little hand grenade cones🥰. Elkhorn Mts anywhere near Cusick Mtn?
Not really, Cusick Mt is in the Wallowa Mountain range, and the Elkhorn Mts are there own range right outside of town here. Any time you want to collect, we'll go get you several!;)
 

Potawatomi13

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Thanks for the invite. Currently no room or time to travel. Could be fun tho.
 

andrewiles

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Checked out some high country in eastern Washington yesterday. Lots of cankers on the white bark pines :-(

PXL_20210618_005119079.jpg
 

August44

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I don't know what that is but this is the rust disease that affects/kills them. As I said previously, I think WBP are a weak tree and one needs to look hard to find a good one to collect.
 

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andrewiles

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I'm pretty sure it's bluster rust. I saw others that had fully pushed through the bark and they look like your photo and the photos I see online.
 

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